After broken promise, AT&T says it’ll stop selling phone location data

After broken promise, AT&T says it’ll stop selling phone location data

Earlier this week, AT&T said it "only permit[s] sharing of location when a customer gives permission for cases like fraud prevention or emergency roadside assistance or when required by law." But the Motherboard investigation showed that the data was being re-sold on the black market, allowing pretty much anyone to get the location of other people's phones.

Carriers Swore They'd Stop Selling Location Data. Will They Ever?

Carriers Swore They'd Stop Selling Location Data. Will They Ever?

"This is a blatant abuse of user privacy, and when companies break their promises to their users, they should expect to be held accountable." Eva Galperin, EFF Bottom line: The carriers said specifically they would stop selling customer location data to third parties.

“Change Encryption Laws Or We'll Pay Zero Tax Elsewhere" Says Tech Giants — The Betoota Advocate

“Change Encryption Laws Or We'll Pay Zero Tax Elsewhere" Says Tech Giants — The Betoota Advocate

LOUIS BURKE | Culture | CONTACT Multinational tech companies are threatening to leave the country after the passing of the Access and Assistance Bill, which could cost the government up to $0 in taxes if they make good on their threat.

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“Do no harm” in the digital age: Privacy and security cannot be ignored

“Do no harm” in the digital age: Privacy and security cannot be ignored

As explored in our new report with the International Committee of the Red Cross - The humanitarian metadata problem: ‘Doing no harm’ in the digital era, metadata is generated by humanitarian organisations as they coordinate responses, communicate with staff, and engage with the people they serve.

Development and Humanitarian Sector

Development and Humanitarian Sector

There is no question that advancements in technology, communications and data-intensive systems have significantly changed the way development programmes are delivered and humanitarian assistance can be provided to ensure more people can benefit, more rapidly and more effectively.

Australia passes controversial encryption law, raising serious privacy and legal concerns

Australia passes controversial encryption law, raising serious privacy and legal concerns

Technical capability notice: A notice issued by the attorney general, requiring tech companies to “build a new capability” to decrypt communications for law enforcement.

‘Black box’ devices could be fitted to all new cars

‘Black box’ devices could be fitted to all new cars

The European Council is proposing that every new car has the data-logging device, which would record the vehicle’s speed, state of safety assistance features and “crash-related parameters and information before, during and after a collision”.

Australia Passes Anti-Encryption Bill—Here's Everything You Need To Know

Australia Passes Anti-Encryption Bill—Here's Everything You Need To Know

A notice to request tech companies for providing "voluntary assistance" to law enforcement, which includes "removing electronic protection, providing technical information, installing software, putting information in a particular format and facilitating access to devices or services." Technical Assistance Notice (TAN) : This notice requires, rather than request, tech companies to give assistance they are already capable of providing that is reasonable, proportionate, practical and technically feasible, giving Australian agencies the flexibility to seek decryption of encrypted communications in circumstances where companies have existing means to do it (like at points where messages are not end-to-end encrypted).

Cisco contradicts Dutton’s claim breaking digital encryption won’t create ‘back doors’

Cisco contradicts Dutton’s claim breaking digital encryption won’t create ‘back doors’

At a committee hearing in Canberra on Friday, witnesses from Cisco, Optus and Telstra called for a better definition of the bill’s main safeguard that tech companies cannot be asked to build “systemic” weaknesses into their products.

Australian Encryption Bill – An Exploitable Backdoor in the Startup Community -

Australian Encryption Bill – An Exploitable Backdoor in the Startup Community -

Co-founder of block-chain startup Loki, Josh Jessop-Smith is concerned that the Australian encryption bill would entirely undermine their project. The main concern is that by allowing law enforcement to access encrypted data, it is a possibility that the business deal revolving around that data may become vulnerable and thus, get exploited easily.

Google and Facebook join rights groups to fight Australia's encryption bill

Google and Facebook join rights groups to fight Australia's encryption bill

Tech heavyweights Google and Facebook have joined civil and digital rights groups in an unusual alliance aimed at defeating Australia’s planned encryption laws. The Communications Alliance chief executive, John Stanton, said the government was trying to ram its encryption legislation through without proper consultation.

Australia's surveillance laws could damage internet security globally, overseas critics say

Australia's surveillance laws could damage internet security globally, overseas critics say

The submission's signatories are concerned about any attempt, anywhere in the world, to undermine encryption — the process that keeps online products and services secure, said Sharon Bradford Franklin, its co-author and Open Technology Institute's director of cybersecurity policy in Washington, DC.

Trust Us, We’re Secretly Working for a Foreign Government: How Australia’s Proposed Surveillance Laws Will Break The Trust Tech Depends On

Trust Us, We’re Secretly Working for a Foreign Government: How Australia’s Proposed Surveillance Laws Will Break The Trust Tech Depends On

Our technology would have to serve two masters: their customers, and what a broad array of Australian government departments decides are the “interests of Australia’s national security.” Australia would not be the last to demand these powers: a long line of countries are waiting to demand the same kind of “assistance.”

Coalition's surveillance laws give police power to access electronic devices

Coalition's surveillance laws give police power to access electronic devices

Law enforcement agencies would gain new powers to conduct covert surveillance on electronic devices and compel technology companies to assist in decrypting private communications under proposed legislation. Taylor said the reforms “will allow law enforcement and interception agencies to access specific communications without compromising the security of a network”.

Police chiefs want new data-sharing treaty with U.S. as privacy questions linger

Police chiefs want new data-sharing treaty with U.S. as privacy questions linger

The chiefs see an opportunity for a virtual leap forward following Washington's passage of the Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data (CLOUD) Act. The new law allows the U.S. to sign bilateral agreements with other countries to simplify the sharing of information on criminal justice matters, as long as signatories have proper safeguards in place.