In a court filing, Edward Snowden says a report critical to an NSA lawsuit is authentic

In a court filing, Edward Snowden says a report critical to an NSA lawsuit is authentic

Snowden’s signed declaration, filed on October 31, confirms that one of the documents he leaked, which the EFF relied heavily on for its case, is an authentic draft document written by the then-NSA inspector general in 2009, which exposed concerns about the legality of the Bush’s warrantless surveillance program — Stellar Wind — particularly the collection of bulk email records on Americans.

Snowden Files Declaration in NSA Spying Case Confirming Authenticity of Draft Inspector General Report Discussing Unprecedented Surveillance of Americans, Which He Helped Expose

Snowden Files Declaration in NSA Spying Case Confirming Authenticity of Draft Inspector General Report Discussing Unprecedented Surveillance of Americans, Which He Helped Expose

Mr. Snowden’s short declaration confirms that a document relied upon in the case, a draft NSA Inspector General Report from 2009 discussing the mass surveillance program known as Stellar Wind, is actually the same document that he came upon during the course of his employment at NSA contractor.

Russian court orders Telegram messaging app to pay fine

Russian court orders Telegram messaging app to pay fine

The fine came after Telegram refused to provide its users' encryption keys to Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB). Encryption keys like the ones used by Telegram and other messaging services enable users to communicate in a way that keeps the content of their messages secret even if they are intercepted by intelligence services or other third parties.

Passcodes are protected by Fifth Amendment, says court

Passcodes are protected by Fifth Amendment, says court

Regardless of the “foregone conclusion” standard, producing a passcode is testimonial and has the potential to harm the defendant, just like any other Fifth Amendment violation would, the Florida court said.

U.S. Supreme Court divided over Google privacy settlement

U.S. Supreme Court divided over Google privacy settlement

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Supreme Court justices, in an internet privacy case involving Google(GOOGL.O), disagreed on Wednesday over whether to rein in a form of settlement in class action lawsuits that awards money to charities and other third parties instead of to people affected by the alleged wrongdoing.

Feds Also Using 'Reverse Warrants' To Gather Location/Identifying Info On Thousands Of Non-Suspects

Feds Also Using 'Reverse Warrants' To Gather Location/Identifying Info On Thousands Of Non-Suspects

What used to be officers canvassing the area where a crime took place is now a warrant sent to Google to obtain location data and identifying info for all people and devices in the area.

EFF Sues California Law Enforcement Agency For Refusing To Hand Over Stingray Documents

EFF Sues California Law Enforcement Agency For Refusing To Hand Over Stingray Documents

In an attempt to learn about Defendants’ use of these devices, EFF sent a request for records relating to six cell site simulator warrants that precisely identified each warrant using the information on the Department of Justice’s OpenJustice website, including the date range of the authorized search, the nature of the investigation, the items to be searched for, and the exact date and time Defendants electronically provided information about them to the Department of Justice.

Court: Teen’s driving killed someone, but he can’t be forced to give up passcode

Court: Teen’s driving killed someone, but he can’t be forced to give up passcode

A Florida state appellate court has ruled that an inebriated teenager involved in a car crash that resulted in the death of another person cannot be compelled to provide a passcode to his iPhone 7—the boy can indeed invoke a Fifth Amendment privilege, protecting him against self-incrimination.

What Happens When Telecom Companies Search Your Home for Piracy

What Happens When Telecom Companies Search Your Home for Piracy

“I agree that there are legal sources of content on the internet, but the evidence that was before the court and our client's position is that that was not the purpose of TVAddons,” Guillaume Lavoie Ste-Marie, a lawyer representing the telecoms and media companies suing Lackman, told me over the phone.

Busted by a Facebook ‘friend’/undercover cop? Court: It’s legal!

Busted by a Facebook ‘friend’/undercover cop? Court: It’s legal!

When it was executed that same day, police found a number of items that had been on the nightstand in the Facebook post, including a loaded 9mm Smith & Wesson handgun, the black T-shirt and the red necklace that Everett was wearing in the framed photo.

How a 19th-Century Teenager Sparked a Battle Over Who Owns Our Faces

How a 19th-Century Teenager Sparked a Battle Over Who Owns Our Faces

In 1890, two Harvard legal scholars, Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis, tackled the then-new technology in a now-famous (among students of the law) Harvard Law Review article arguing that because “instantaneous photographs … [had] invaded the sacred precincts of private and domestic life,” people needed a constitutionally recognized right to be let alone, or a “right of privacy.” Roberson’s case a decade later gave the courts the first opportunity to decide whether to take their advice.

UIDAI proposal for SIM cards impacts privacy

UIDAI proposal for SIM cards impacts privacy

On Friday, a joint statement said, “In fact, the DoT and UIDAI are in a process to bring out a completely hassle-free and digital procedure for issuing new SIM cards through a mobile app, which will be fully compliant of the Supreme Court judgement in the Aadhaar Case.”

Lawyers for 'GTA: Online' Get Court Order to Search Homes of Alleged Cheat Makers

Lawyers for 'GTA: Online' Get Court Order to Search Homes of Alleged Cheat Makers

Infamous is one of several “mod menus” or third-party cheat programs that players access by loading specific files onto a PC or a modified last-gen console, letting users do pretty much anything they can imagine in GTA 5’s online and offline modes, ranging from creating clone armies to making money rain from the sky.

EPIC Files Appeals with D.C. Circuit, Seeks Release of 'Predictive Analytics Report'

EPIC has appealed a federal district court decision for the release of a "Predictive Analytics Report." The district court backed the Department of Justice when the agency claimed the "presidential communications privilege." But neither the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals nor the Supreme Court has ever permitted a federal agency to invoke that privilege in a FOIA case.

Alert: Consultation on Data Protection Bill…

Alert: Consultation on Data Protection Bill…

The ongoing government consultation on a draft privacy and data protection law has been extended and is still open for public comment. A few minutes will help you protect your privacy and data for years to come.

FCC resorts to the usual malarkey defending itself against Mozilla lawsuit

FCC resorts to the usual malarkey defending itself against Mozilla lawsuit

The Mozilla suit, which you can read here or embedded at the bottom of this post, was sort of a cluster bomb of allegations striking at the FCC order on technical, legal, and procedural grounds.

How An Amateur Rap Crew Stole Surveillance Tech That Tracks Almost Every American

How An Amateur Rap Crew Stole Surveillance Tech That Tracks Almost Every American

Cops alleged Da Boss and his co-conspirators had access to the Holy Grail for any Internet-age scam artist: a surveillance technology that police and debt collectors use to track most of the United States’ 325 million inhabitants via their Social Security numbers, license plates, address histories, names and dates of birth.

The Rutherford Institute :: Creating a Suspect Society: The Scary Side of the Technological Police State

The Rutherford Institute :: Creating a Suspect Society: The Scary Side of the Technological Police State

Consequently, no longer are we “innocent until proven guilty” in the face of DNA evidence that places us at the scene of a crime, behavior sensing technology that interprets our body temperature and facial tics as suspicious, and government surveillance devices that cross-check our biometrics, license plates and DNA against a growing database of unsolved crimes and potential criminals.

UK high court blocks mass privacy action against Google

UK high court blocks mass privacy action against Google

The high court has blocked a mass lawsuit against Google that aimed to collect as much as £3bn in compensation for the company’s historical practice of collecting data on iPhone users whose privacy settings should have prevented surveillance.

Google praises London court’s decision to block iPhone data collection lawsuit

Google praises London court’s decision to block iPhone data collection lawsuit

LONDON (Reuters) – Google welcomed a decision on Monday by London’s High Court to block an attempt to bring legal action over claims it had collected sensitive data from 4 million iPhone users in England and Wales.

Google may face £3.3bn bill for UK customers' data breach

Google could face a compensation bill of up to £3.3bn over claims it harvested personal data, including political views and health information, from more than four million Britons without their permission. Mr Lloyd set up a consumer campaign called Google You Owe Us as part of this legal action.

Feds to judge: We still think we can put GPS trackers on cars entering US

Feds to judge: We still think we can put GPS trackers on cars entering US

A top Homeland Security Investigations official has told a federal court that it remains the agency's policy that officers can install a GPS tracking device on cars entering the United States "without a warrant or individualized suspicion" for up to 48 hours.

What to Know About Aadhaar, India's Biometric Identity System

What to Know About Aadhaar, India's Biometric Identity System

India’s Supreme Court, in a landmark ruling, said that private companies could no longer require users to provide their Aadhaar details as a condition of service.

Exclusive: In test case, U.S. fails to force Facebook to wiretap Messenger calls - sources

Exclusive: In test case, U.S. fails to force Facebook to wiretap Messenger calls - sources

Members of a joint federal and state task force probing the international criminal gang MS-13 had tried in August to hold Facebook in contempt of court for failing to carry out a wiretap order, Reuters reported last month.

US government loses bid to force Facebook to wiretap Messenger calls

US government loses bid to force Facebook to wiretap Messenger calls

A joint federal and state law enforcement effort investigating the MS-13 gang had pushed a district court to hold the social networking giant in contempt of court for refusing to permit real-time listening in on voice calls.

Aadhaar, the world's largest biometric identity database, approved by India's Supreme Court

Aadhaar, the world's largest biometric identity database, approved by India's Supreme Court

Key points: Indian residents cannot receive welfare food rations, other benefits without being entered into Aadhaar Until today, Indian residents have had to link their private bank accounts, mobile numbers and even school admissions to their profile in the government database.

Press release: UK intelligence agency admits unlawfully spying on Privacy International

Press release: UK intelligence agency admits unlawfully spying on Privacy International

https://privacyinternational.org/sites/default/files/2018-03/A1.%20Claimant%27s%20re-amended%20statement%20of%20grounds.pdf The challenge to the acquisition, use, retention, disclosure, storage and deletion of ‘Bulk Personal Datasets’ (BPDs) and Bulk Communications Data (BCDs) by the UK Intelligence Agencies was commenced by Privacy International on 8 June 2015.

UK Surveillance Regime Violated Human Rights

UK Surveillance Regime Violated Human Rights

On September 13, after a five-year legal battle, the European Court of Human Rights said that the UK government’s surveillance regime—which includes the country’s mass surveillance programs, methods, laws, and judges—violated the human rights to privacy and to freedom of expression.

Top court rules UK mass interception of fiber-optic cable traffic violates the right to privacy: a victory, but how big?

Top court rules UK mass interception of fiber-optic cable traffic violates the right to privacy: a victory, but how big?

One of those efforts has just come to fruition: the European Court of Human Rights has ruled that the UK’s use of mass surveillance, as revealed by Snowden, violates the fundamental right to privacy.

Workplace Wellness Plans Offer Big Incentives, But May Cost Your Privacy

Workplace Wellness Plans Offer Big Incentives, But May Cost Your Privacy

The decision casts uncertainty over what the appropriate upper limit for these types of financial incentives should be — specifically when employers offer them to workers to participate in programs that require clinical testing or the disclosure of their personal health data.

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