Dozens of Cities Have Secretly Experimented With Predictive Policing Software

Dozens of Cities Have Secretly Experimented With Predictive Policing Software

The documents obtained by Motherboard—which include PredPol contract documents, instructional manuals and slide presentations for using the software, and PredPol contract negotiation emails with government officials—were obtained from the police departments of South Jordan, UT; Mountain View, CA; Atlanta, GA; Haverhill, GA; Palo Alto, CA; Modesto, CA; Merced, CA; Livermore, CA; Tacoma, WA; and the University of California, Berkeley using public records requests.

The San Francisco District Attorney’s 10 Most Surveilled Neighborhoods

The San Francisco District Attorney’s 10 Most Surveilled Neighborhoods

According to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency , “The system is designed so that it can only take a photograph during a red light and cannot take a photograph during a yellow or green light.” Although the SFMTA reports it has 20 red light cameras across the city, the District Attorney data includes 26 of these cameras.

UK police use of computer programs to predict crime sparks discrimination warning

UK police use of computer programs to predict crime sparks discrimination warning

The rapid growth in the use of computer programs to predict crime hotspots and people who are likely to reoffend risks locking discrimination into the criminal justice system, a report has warned.

Chinese face-recognition technology spots wanted man at 60,000-people concert

Chinese face-recognition technology spots wanted man at 60,000-people concert

The most funny and cyberpunk dystopia part was, during a test run, if the jaywalkers don't want to pay a fine, traffic police has given them another opinion: posting an warning of your misbehave on your social media account!The mass-deployment may be coming soon.And it is rumored that the subways would soon require a proof of identity.

Happy Data Privacy Day: City Planning Now Mines Everyone’s Data All the Time

Happy Data Privacy Day: City Planning Now Mines Everyone’s Data All the Time

Sidewalk Labs, a subsidiary of Google’s parent company Alphabet, is the go-to story for Data Privacy Day with its new “user-friendly” tool called Replica, which allows city planners see “how, when, and where people travel in urban areas.” The Intercept’s explainer details a troubling use of consumer data.

Mumbai-based Businessman Loses Rs 1.86 Crore After Six Missed Calls

Mumbai-based Businessman Loses Rs 1.86 Crore After Six Missed Calls

The hackers had allegedly got a new SIM card in the businessman’s name, deactivated his old SIM card through the missed calls, reported Mumbai Mirror. The businessman had six missed calls from two numbers on his mobile phone.

The US Is Buying Phone Hacking Tools for Ghana’s Police

The US Is Buying Phone Hacking Tools for Ghana’s Police

The State Department is purchasing some very specific phone hacking tools that it plans to turn over to the Ghanaian police force to assist the country’s investigations into international crime.

When Policing and Privacy Intersect

When Policing and Privacy Intersect

Superintendent Harrison said that because the New Orleans Police Department was under a federal consent decree, his staff had been working with the decree’s monitor to create and carry out policies that ensured that camera images could be uploaded only to a secure police-evidence cloud, not downloaded by an operator.

Julian Assange’s Secret Charges Revealed Due to “Cut-Paste” Error

Julian Assange’s Secret Charges Revealed Due to “Cut-Paste” Error

On Friday 16 November it was revealed that Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has been charged with other offenses than those publicly known. WikiLeak’s Twitter has said Assange appeared on the court documents for a sex crime, due to a “cut and paste” error.

Should police be allowed to forensically search mobiles?

Should police be allowed to forensically search mobiles?

A Police Scotland bid to use cyber kiosks to gather data from mobile devices has been delayed amid concerns the technology may be unlawful. The technology allows officers to circumvent passwords or other security measures to access and extract data stored on mobile devices suspected of being used in cyber crime.

The Rutherford Institute :: Creating a Suspect Society: The Scary Side of the Technological Police State

The Rutherford Institute :: Creating a Suspect Society: The Scary Side of the Technological Police State

Consequently, no longer are we “innocent until proven guilty” in the face of DNA evidence that places us at the scene of a crime, behavior sensing technology that interprets our body temperature and facial tics as suspicious, and government surveillance devices that cross-check our biometrics, license plates and DNA against a growing database of unsolved crimes and potential criminals.

Police super-database poses a "grave risk" to privacy rights

Police super-database poses a "grave risk" to privacy rights

In one consultation, Liberty claimed, groups were told the new database would include information the goverment and police have no legal right to hold; but will do so regardless.

That sign telling you how fast you’re driving may be spying on you

That sign telling you how fast you’re driving may be spying on you

According to recently released US federal contracting data, the Drug Enforcement Administration will be expanding the footprint of its nationwide surveillance network with the purchase of “multiple” trailer-mounted speed displays “to be retrofitted as mobile LPR [License Plate Reader] platforms.” The DEA is buying them from RU2 Systems Inc., a private Mesa, Arizona company.

Police super-database prompts Liberty warning on privacy

Police super-database prompts Liberty warning on privacy

Liberty said in one meeting it was told the new database would include information the government and the police have no legal basis to hold but will do so anyway.

US, UK and others push for mandatory access to encrypted data

US, UK and others push for mandatory access to encrypted data

The countries said any measures would honor privacy and oversight laws, but also contended that the same laws allowing them to search homes and cars also gave them permission to obtain any private data they deemed legally necessary. "Privacy laws must prevent arbitrary or unlawful interference, but privacy is not absolute," the group said in its statement.

Five-Eyes nations to force encryption backdoors

Five-Eyes nations to force encryption backdoors

While the statement says the five countries "are committed to an open, safe and secure internet", it also calls for the tech industry to develop solutions that prevent illegal and illicit content from ever being uploaded.

• Chart: The Crimes Americans Worry About Most

• Chart: The Crimes Americans Worry About Most

That's according to a new Gallup poll which found that 67 percent of U.S. adults frequently or occasionally fret about having personal, credit card or financial information stolen by hackers.

FBI Looking For Tech to Foil Fingerprint Obliteration

FBI Looking For Tech to Foil Fingerprint Obliteration

“The [Criminal Justice Information Services] Division has identified a growing trend in which criminals intentionally alter their fingerprints to defeat identification within the NGI System,” officials wrote in a request for information.