Facing EPIC Lawsuit, FAA Scraps Secretive Drone Committees

The FAA's Drone Advisory Committee, facing an open government lawsuit from EPIC, has scrapped the secretive committees that developed drone policy. EPIC has a long history of promoting government transparency and advocating for privacy protections against drones.

Delay, Deny and Deflect: How Facebook’s Leaders Fought Through Crisis

Delay, Deny and Deflect: How Facebook’s Leaders Fought Through Crisis

This account of how Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg navigated Facebook’s cascading crises, much of which has not been previously reported, is based on interviews with more than 50 people.

Unpatched Android OS Flaw Allows Adversaries to Track User Location

Unpatched Android OS Flaw Allows Adversaries to Track User Location

CVE-2018-9489, now patched as mentioned, allows adversaries to explore and attack the local WiFi network, or identify and physically track any Android device, by exposing a range of WiFi information.

EPIC Supports Constitutionality of "Robocall" Law

EPIC has filed a "friend of the court" brief in a case concerning the constitutionality of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, the law the prohibits unwanted "robocalls." In Gallion v.

State senator sought to weaken biometric privacy protections he had championed

State senator sought to weaken biometric privacy protections he had championed

Link's effort to change the now 10-year-old Biometric Information Privacy Act came as lawsuits were being filed by Illinois residents accusing Facebook of improperly using digital facial recognition in photo tagging.

Congress May Consider a U.S. Version of GDPR

Congress May Consider a U.S. Version of GDPR

Even after all the committee hearings and the flurry of legislative proposals introduced in the House of Representatives and the Senate, there hasn’t been a lot of movement on security and privacy out of Congress over the past few years.

Orlando Testing Facial Recognition Technology Provided Free by Amazon

Orlando Testing Facial Recognition Technology Provided Free by Amazon

Amazon marketed its facial recognition tools to Orlando’s police department, providing tens of thousands of dollars of technology to the city at no cost, and shielding the Rekognition pilot with a mutual nondisclosure agreement that kept its details out of the public eye.

Iris Recognition

Iris Recognition

Making the risk of data breach even greater, law enforcement often stores its iris biometrics on databases operated by vendors and other private third parties.

Net Neutrality, Surveillance, Privacy and the World We Live In.

Net Neutrality, Surveillance, Privacy and the World We Live In.

In plain English this means that Spectrum, for example, can contact Netflix, or the like, and demand, “if you want your content to continue being delivered at full customer bandwidth, then you now need to pay us a premium fee.” This, in fact, is not a new issue and companies like Google, Spotify and Riot Games have already complained because their service is slower than it should be.

Starting November 1st, Chinese police can go to any Chinese ISP to copy your data

Starting November 1st, Chinese police can go to any Chinese ISP to copy your data

It goes on top of a law passed in 2016 that mandates ISPs store 6 months of IP address connection data and makes it very clear that your internet traffic is available to be monitored.

Documents shed light on how Amazon is shaping public discourse about Rekognition

Documents shed light on how Amazon is shaping public discourse about Rekognition

The official statement read in part: “the City of Orlando will continue to test Amazon Rekognition facial recognition software to determine if this technology could reliably identify specific individuals as they come within view of specific cameras.” The documents obtained by Buzzfeed provide a look behind the curtain at communications between the company and the police department, as Orlando’s test pilot was thrust into the national spotlight.

Senate Dem wants to imprison tech execs over repeated privacy violations

Senate Dem wants to imprison tech execs over repeated privacy violations

A Democratic senator has unveiled a new proposal for a national privacy law, one that would subject technology CEOs to lengthy prison sentences for repeated violations. Wyden says that the proposal is meant to start a discussion as Congress deliberates over a national privacy standard following a string of data scandals at major companies.

Data breach: Microsoft shared Indian bank customers’ financial details with US intelligence agencies

Data breach: Microsoft shared Indian bank customers’ financial details with US intelligence agencies

In response to the RBI risk assessment observation, seen by DNA Money, a bank acknowledged that they have agreed with Microsoft, and according to the deal, Microsoft will only share the bank customers’ data if the order was issued by the government of India or an Indian court.

Feds Also Using 'Reverse Warrants' To Gather Location/Identifying Info On Thousands Of Non-Suspects

Feds Also Using 'Reverse Warrants' To Gather Location/Identifying Info On Thousands Of Non-Suspects

What used to be officers canvassing the area where a crime took place is now a warrant sent to Google to obtain location data and identifying info for all people and devices in the area.

How Congress could rein in Google and Facebook

How Congress could rein in Google and Facebook

After ambitious new data-sharing regulations like the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Congress is planning its own data privacy law, and how it’s written will matter immensely for companies like Google and Facebook.

Spy and police chiefs demand passage of Australian encryption access law

Spy and police chiefs demand passage of Australian encryption access law

Without providing any evidence, Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) chief Duncan Lewis told a parliamentary committee hearing on October 19 that suspected terrorists were using encrypted messages to plan potential attacks.

Protecting Data Privacy Without Destroying the Internet

Protecting Data Privacy Without Destroying the Internet

It is reasonable to be skeptical of the notion that increasing government power is the key to protecting privacy, but without federal preemption, the nation could balkanize with 50 sets of online privacy rules, undermining the seamless digital experience consumers enjoy today as well as the internet economy which powers some 10 percent of national gross domestic product.

To regulate AI we need new laws, not just a code of ethics | Paul Chadwick

To regulate AI we need new laws, not just a code of ethics | Paul Chadwick

“We need a new culture of technology and business development for the age of AI which we call ‘rule of law, democracy and human rights by design’,” Nemitz writes.

Fork Over Passwords or Pay the Price, New Zealand Tells Travelers

Fork Over Passwords or Pay the Price, New Zealand Tells Travelers

Travelers entering New Zealand who refuse to disclose passwords for their digital devices during forced searches could face prosecution and fines of more than $3,000, a move that border officials said Tuesday made the country the first to impose such penalties.

Court: Teen’s driving killed someone, but he can’t be forced to give up passcode

Court: Teen’s driving killed someone, but he can’t be forced to give up passcode

A Florida state appellate court has ruled that an inebriated teenager involved in a car crash that resulted in the death of another person cannot be compelled to provide a passcode to his iPhone 7—the boy can indeed invoke a Fifth Amendment privilege, protecting him against self-incrimination.

Nobody’s Cellphone Is Really That Secure

Nobody’s Cellphone Is Really That Secure

Given the wealth of insecurities and the array of eavesdropping techniques, it’s safe to say that lots of countries are spying on the phones of both foreign officials and their own citizens.

Julia Reda – Where EU member states stand on upload filters and the “link tax”

By no means is the new mandatory teaching exception supposed to limit what is allowed under the existing optional exception for research and education.

California Banned Default Passwords, But Will This Increase Security?

California Banned Default Passwords, But Will This Increase Security?

This law mandates that manufacturers preprogram a unique password for each individual device and that the user is required to change this password upon first login.

“Information Fiduciaries” Must Protect Your Data Privacy

“Information Fiduciaries” Must Protect Your Data Privacy

Accordingly, several law professors have proposed adapting these venerable fiduciary rules to apply to online companies that collect personal data from their customers.

How a 19th-Century Teenager Sparked a Battle Over Who Owns Our Faces

How a 19th-Century Teenager Sparked a Battle Over Who Owns Our Faces

In 1890, two Harvard legal scholars, Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis, tackled the then-new technology in a now-famous (among students of the law) Harvard Law Review article arguing that because “instantaneous photographs … [had] invaded the sacred precincts of private and domestic life,” people needed a constitutionally recognized right to be let alone, or a “right of privacy.” Roberson’s case a decade later gave the courts the first opportunity to decide whether to take their advice.

Apple Reportedly Blocked Police iPhone Hacking Tool and Nobody Knows How

Apple Reportedly Blocked Police iPhone Hacking Tool and Nobody Knows How

On Wednesday, he cited sources from the forensic community who’ve told him that Apple’s efforts to keep bad actors and law enforcement from cracking into its users’ phones have paid off. In March, Forbes reported that GrayShift counts at least one ex-Apple security engineer as part of its team.

Tim Cook calls for GDPR-style privacy laws in the US

Tim Cook calls for GDPR-style privacy laws in the US

"Platforms and algorithms that promised to improve our lives can actually magnify our worst human tendencies," said Cook. Cook praised Europe's "successful implementation" of privacy law GDPR, and said that "It is time for the rest of the world ...

Governments want your encrypted data, Australia wants them to have it, and you should be worried

Governments want your encrypted data, Australia wants them to have it, and you should be worried

This legislation comes after the Five Eyes intelligence alliance, including Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the U.S., and the U.K., released a statement calling for government access to encrypted files on the basis of national security and crime prevention.

Tim Cook: Personal data collection is being 'weaponized against us with military efficiency'

Tim Cook: Personal data collection is being 'weaponized against us with military efficiency'

And those of us who believe in technology's potential for good must not shrink from this moment," Cook said. They may say to you, "Our companies will never achieve technology's true potential if they are constrained with privacy regulation." But this notion isn't just wrong, it is destructive.

Apple boss takes aim at 'weaponisation' of customer data

Apple boss takes aim at 'weaponisation' of customer data

BRUSSELS: Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook said on Wednesday (Oct 24) customer data was being "weaponised with military efficiency" by companies to increase profit. Cook said Apple fully backed a federal privacy law in the United States, something Europe has already introduced via its General Data Protection Regulation.

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