DEA Continues Mass Surveillance of Americans Phone Call Records

DEA Continues Mass Surveillance of Americans Phone Call Records

According to a report recently released by the Office of Inspector General of the United States Department of Justice, the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is continuing to operate its mass surveillance program which collects billions of call detail records of Americans and foreigners every day.

23 Tech Companies Back CCPA Amendment to Make It Stronger: Privacy for All Act of 2019

23 Tech Companies Back CCPA Amendment to Make It Stronger: Privacy for All Act of 2019

The pro-privacy law sets a new standard of trust online in the U.S., requiring companies doing business in California with revenues over $25 million or who process information from over 50,000 residents a year to comply with a new set of personal information rights.

How AI helps facial recognition really get to know your face

How AI helps facial recognition really get to know your face

To work well, facial recognition systems need images with well-illuminated, clear faces that give a neural network detailed, accurate data. Royal Caribbean Cruises has twice as many passengers as Northwell has patients, and more of them, too, will see facial recognition as the program expands, project leader Schneider said.

Turn in your smartphones! How Mueller kept a lid on Trump-Russia probe

Turn in your smartphones! How Mueller kept a lid on Trump-Russia probe

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - When members of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team investigating Russia’s role in the 2016 U.S. election have arrived for work each day, they have placed their mobile phones in a locker outside of their office suite before entering.

U.S. agency error exposes 2.3 million disaster survivors to fraud: watchdog

U.S. agency error exposes 2.3 million disaster survivors to fraud: watchdog

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) exposed 2.3 million disaster survivors to possible identity theft and fraud by improperly sharing sensitive personal information with an outside company, according to an internal government watchdog.

Your Health Data Are a Gold Mine for Advertisers

Your Health Data Are a Gold Mine for Advertisers

“We kept privacy in mind as we were building our KidsMD skills.” Privacy foregrounds the conversation as providers explore voice-enabled health care and balance legal concerns with giving sound medical advice.

Microsoft CEO Calls for Global Implementation of GDPR-like Legislation

Microsoft CEO Calls for Global Implementation of GDPR-like Legislation

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, speaking recently during an on-stage interview at World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland, lead the calls for the global introduction of legislation that enshrines data privacy as a human right.

Federal agency looking at fitness trackers for public sector workers

Federal agency looking at fitness trackers for public sector workers

"Interactive insurance policies give consumers the opportunity to receive discounts on premiums for sharing health-related information through wearable tracking devices," says the memo.

Thailand passes controversial cybersecurity law that could enable government surveillance

Thailand passes controversial cybersecurity law that could enable government surveillance

Thailand’s government passed a controversial cybersecurity bill today that has been criticized for vagueness and the potential to enable sweeping access to internet user data.

Privacy advocate held at gunpoint after license plate reader database mistake, lawsuit alleges

Privacy advocate held at gunpoint after license plate reader database mistake, lawsuit alleges

Brian Hofer, chair of Oakland’s Privacy Advisory Commission, said in a suit filed in December that he had rented a car and was traveling with his brother in November when he was pulled over by a Contra Costa Sheriff’s Office deputy, and more police cars joined.

WeWork Just Made a Disturbing Acquisition. It Raises a Lot of Flags About Workers' Privacy

WeWork Just Made a Disturbing Acquisition. It Raises a Lot of Flags About Workers' Privacy

This workplace of the future sounds creepy WeWork's latest acquisition is a small software company with 24 employees. Euclid does this by tracking how people move around physical spaces. So it sounds like WeWork might try out Euclid's analytics technology first in those locations.

As Concerns Over Facial Recognition Grow, Members Of Congress Are Considering Their Next Move

As Concerns Over Facial Recognition Grow, Members Of Congress Are Considering Their Next Move

BuzzFeed News has learned that the US House Oversight and Reform Committee is considering holding a hearing on facial recognition, which has been widely implemented across the country despite growing concerns about the technology’s potential privacy and civil rights implications.

Former policeman Steven Albee fined for sharing intimate photos of arrested woman

Former policeman Steven Albee fined for sharing intimate photos of arrested woman

Albee examined the photos at the police station then uploaded two to a Facebook group chat with four other serving police officers.

Call for Legal Safeguards on Police Phone Hacking

Call for Legal Safeguards on Police Phone Hacking

Related: Police Scotland Failed to “Fully Assess” The Use of Cyber Kiosks Lindsey Miller, deputy Crown agent for serious casework, said that there was a misunderstanding that Crown counsel could offer “broad guidance on police powers.” Hacked data would only be admissible if extracted under certain legal conditions, and suggested it would be inadmissible if extracted in a manner that breached a suspect’s human rights, she said.

The Home Office Is Building A Massive Database Of Migrants That Will Offer Instant Checks To Outside Organisations

The Home Office Is Building A Massive Database Of Migrants That Will Offer Instant Checks To Outside Organisations

But the dangers of database sharing without proper scrutiny, could lead to the same discriminatory mistakes that saw Windrush citizens wrongly labelled as illegal and threatened with deportation.” Since the Data Protection Act was passed in May, people dealing with the Home Office on immigration matters can be barred from accessing information about their case using data protection laws.

On Covering Webcams

On Covering Webcams

Mac users should install Malwarebytes or other malware-fighting software — and don’t turn off any security features just because someone asks you to. […] So, no, I don’t believe that malware could be installed to enable the camera without lighting the LED.

Facebook Can't Gather Users' Data From Other Websites, German Antitrust Office Says

Facebook Can't Gather Users' Data From Other Websites, German Antitrust Office Says

All Tech Considered 3 Things You Should Know About Europe's Sweeping New Data Privacy Law The Federal Cartel Office says Facebook's subsidiaries such as WhatsApp and Instagram can continue to collect data, but the information cannot be merged with Facebook users' profiles unless they have given their voluntary consent.

Facebook personal data use and privacy settings ruled illegal by German court

Facebook personal data use and privacy settings ruled illegal by German court

Facebook’s default privacy settings and use of personal data are against German consumer law, according to a judgement handed down by a Berlin regional court.

LibreOffice patches malicious code-execution bug, Apache OpenOffice – wait for it, wait for it – doesn't

LibreOffice patches malicious code-execution bug, Apache OpenOffice – wait for it, wait for it – doesn't

After trying various approaches to exploit the vulnerability, Inführ found that he could rig the event to call a specific function within a Python file included with the Python interpreter that ships with LibreOffice.

Wyden pitches jail time, billions in fines for online privacy violators with ‘Do Not Track’ bill

Wyden pitches jail time, billions in fines for online privacy violators with ‘Do Not Track’ bill

“Providing more authority and resources to the US Federal Trade Commission is a critical foundation for robust privacy protection.” The bill’s eye-popping penalties are reserved for large companies and wouldn’t apply to privacy violations themselves.

Police Scotland Failed to "Fully Assess" The Legality of Cyber Kiosks

Police Scotland Failed to "Fully Assess" The Legality of Cyber Kiosks

Related: Concerns Raised Over Police Scotland’s Use of Cyber Kiosks John Finnie, convener of the sub-committee, asked whether Police Scotland will roll out a programme if it did not feel it had the “comprehensive legal authority” to do so.

After years of unrelenting privacy scandals, Facebook hires 3 of its fiercest critics

After years of unrelenting privacy scandals, Facebook hires 3 of its fiercest critics

Greene responded to the Cambridge Analytica scandal by saying “Facebook basically pimped out its users,” arguing that the company covered up “corporate malfeasance.” Greene joins Facebook’s privacy policy team as a manager on law enforcement access and data protection issues.

Proposed UK law could expose journalists’ emails, say critics

Proposed UK law could expose journalists’ emails, say critics

British police forces could find it easier to access journalists’ private emails as a result of legislation making its way through parliament, according to freedom of speech campaigners, who are urging politicians to make a last-minute intervention to secure journalistic freedom.

Microsoft's Bing search engine inaccessible in China

Microsoft's Bing search engine inaccessible in China

These are external links and will open in a new window These are external links and will open in a new window Image copyright Getty Images US tech giant Microsoft has confirmed that its search engine Bing is currently inaccessible in China. Chinese authorities operate a firewall that blocks many US tech platforms, including Facebook and Twitter.

Lawmakers Set the Stage for the Privacy Debate

Lawmakers Set the Stage for the Privacy Debate

The Social Media Privacy and Consumer Rights Act would give people the universal right to opt-out of online data collection and require companies to rewrite terms of service in understandable language.

If Google and LG Like Smart TVs, So Should the Privacy Police

If Google and LG Like Smart TVs, So Should the Privacy Police

If Google and LG Like Smart TVs, So Should the Privacy Police (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The world’s tech police have the opportunity to succeed in televisions where they initially failed with the rest of the connected world, and ensure that users retain a firm grasp on their data.

Pennsylvanians Should Know How the State Police Is Monitoring Social Media

Pennsylvanians Should Know How the State Police Is Monitoring Social Media

By not reviewing the state police’s policy, which would have given the court an understanding of the rationale for redacting most of the document, the Commonwealth Court effectively gave state police — and any other law enforcement agency in Pennsylvania — a blank check to apply the public safety exception of the Right-to-Know Law to any open records request.

Nova warns listeners of data breach affecting 250,000 Australians

Nova warns listeners of data breach affecting 250,000 Australians

Nova chief executive Cathy O’Connor said in a statement on Thursday that individuals were being notified about the steps they can take, with the disclosed information varying from person to person.

At Ring’s R&D Team, Security Gaps and Rookie Engineers

At Ring’s R&D Team, Security Gaps and Rookie Engineers

It was December 2016, and the Santa Monica, Calif., company had recently opened a satellite office in Ukraine to develop products that would use artificial intelligence and motion detection to improve home security. One of the engineers in the room said that to improve Ring’s software, the Kiev office needed access to customer video feeds.

Man sues feds after being detained for refusing to unlock his phone at airport

Man sues feds after being detained for refusing to unlock his phone at airport

After clearing the security checkpoint, Elsharkawi, an American citizen, was pulled aside from the Turkish Airlines boarding line by a Customs and Border Protection officer, who began questioning him about how much cash he was carrying and where he was going. Soon after, another agent, Officer Rodriguez, began searching Elsharkawi’s pockets and discovered his phone.

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