South Korea spycam: hundreds of motel guests secretly filmed and live-streamed online

South Korea spycam: hundreds of motel guests secretly filmed and live-streamed online

About 1,600 people have been secretly filmed in motel rooms in South Korea, with the footage live-streamed online for paying customers to watch, police said Wednesday.

South Korea spycam: hundreds of motel guests secretly filmed and live-streamed online

South Korea spycam: hundreds of motel guests secretly filmed and live-streamed online

Seoul (CNN)About 1,600 people have been secretly filmed in motel rooms in South Korea, with the footage live-streamed online for paying customers to watch, police said Wednesday.

Nevada considers technology to scan cellphones after crashes

Nevada considers technology to scan cellphones after crashes

(AP) — Most states ban texting behind the wheel, but a legislative proposal could make Nevada one of the first states to allow police to use a contentious technology to find out if a person was using a cellphone during a car crash.

Facial recognition overkill: How deputies cracked a $12 shoplifting case

Facial recognition overkill: How deputies cracked a $12 shoplifting case

WCSO Via public records requests, CNET reviewed seven sheriff's office reports that showed facial recognition being put to use in making an arrest. Deputy Jeff Talbot, Washington County's public information officer, said WCSO has made arrests on "crimes on multiple levels" using Rekognition, not just minor offenses.

Police Are Increasingly Taking Advantage of Home DNA Tests. There Aren’t Any Regulations to Stop It.

Police Are Increasingly Taking Advantage of Home DNA Tests. There Aren’t Any Regulations to Stop It.

By the time authorities in Sacramento, California, announced an arrest in the Golden State Killer case in April 2018, Moore had spent years uncovering family secrets for hire as a self-taught expert in DNA and genealogical research.

Man arrested for selling one million Netflix, Spotify, Hulu passwords

Man arrested for selling one million Netflix, Spotify, Hulu passwords

Police in Australia have arrested a man who allegedly made AU $300,000 (US $211,000) running a website which sold the account passwords of popular online subscription services including Netflix, Spotify, Hulu, PSN, and Origin.

How a Bitcoin Evangelist Made Himself Vanish, in 15 (Not So Easy) Steps

How a Bitcoin Evangelist Made Himself Vanish, in 15 (Not So Easy) Steps

After the police left, Mr. Lopp received a call threatening more mayhem if he did not make a large ransom payment in Bitcoin.

Preventing Government Facial Recognition Oppression

Preventing Government Facial Recognition Oppression

The report notes that law enforcement can use facial recognition technology for four purposes: arrest identification (to confirm an arrestee's ID), field identification (to ID a person stopped by an officer), investigative identification (to obtain images for IDing an unidentified suspect), and real-time surveillance (to match unidentified folks to a watchlist).

Google disables Android TV photo sharing for all users after account privacy issue

Google disables Android TV photo sharing for all users after account privacy issue

Until the bug is resolved, Android TV owners won’t be able to set Google Photo albums as their screensaver or view pictures with Google Assistant on their set-top devices or smart TVs, as reported by Android Police .

German police storing bodycam footage on Amazon cloud

German police storing bodycam footage on Amazon cloud

German Federal Police are storing video footage from body cameras on the servers of internet giant Amazon, unleashing a storm of criticism over security and privacy issues.

Limiting Your Digital Footprints in a Surveillance State

Limiting Your Digital Footprints in a Surveillance State

How do New York Times journalists use technology in their jobs and in their personal lives? What are your most important tech tools for reporting in Shanghai, especially with a government known for surveillance? They also know where journalists live because we register our address with police.

Police in Canada Are Tracking People’s ‘Negative’ Behavior In a ‘Risk' Database

Police in Canada Are Tracking People’s ‘Negative’ Behavior In a ‘Risk' Database

Information in the database includes whether a person uses drugs, has been the victim of an assault, or lives in a “negative neighborhood.” The Risk-driven Tracking Database (RTD) is part of a collaborative approach to policing called the Hub model that partners cops, school staff, social workers, health care workers, and the provincial government.

Cops told live facial recog needs oversight, rigorous trial design, protections against bias

Cops told live facial recog needs oversight, rigorous trial design, protections against bias

Zero arrests, 2 correct matches, no criminals: London cops' facial recog tech slammed READ MORE The overall tone was that the design of live facial recognition trials needed to be more rigorous, and the tech should be used with a large dollop of caution, plenty of independent oversight and only if it actually works.

Denver to encrypt police radio traffic, blocking the public — but not news organizations — from listening

Denver to encrypt police radio traffic, blocking the public — but not news organizations — from listening

RELATED: Denver police could be next to go silent as more Colorado agencies encrypt their radio traffic News organizations will have to sign a memorandum of understanding with the city before gaining access, and the city attorney’s office was working this week to finalize what that document will say, Pazen said.

Privacy advocate held at gunpoint after license plate reader database mistake, lawsuit alleges

Privacy advocate held at gunpoint after license plate reader database mistake, lawsuit alleges

Brian Hofer, chair of Oakland’s Privacy Advisory Commission, said in a suit filed in December that he had rented a car and was traveling with his brother in November when he was pulled over by a Contra Costa Sheriff’s Office deputy, and more police cars joined.

Neighbourhood Watched

Neighbourhood Watched

We are campaigning alongside Liberty for the public to have a greater say as to whether their local police force should be allowed to use such highly intrusive technologies.

Reverse location search warrants: How police departments force Google to hand over data on anyone near a crime scene.

Reverse location search warrants: How police departments force Google to hand over data on anyone near a crime scene.

We always push back on overly broad requests to protect our users’ privacy.”] WRAL was able to uncover four instances in which the Raleigh Police Department sought reverse-location data in 2017 for investigations into murder, sexual battery, and the suspected arson.

Can facial recognition start-ups navigate privacy concerns to seek tech riches?

Can facial recognition start-ups navigate privacy concerns to seek tech riches?

It measures the structure of each face, including the distance between eyes, mouth and nose. If that face, or one similar, is spotted by cameras, police can instantly track the suspect and call them in for questioning.

Former policeman Steven Albee fined for sharing intimate photos of arrested woman

Former policeman Steven Albee fined for sharing intimate photos of arrested woman

Albee examined the photos at the police station then uploaded two to a Facebook group chat with four other serving police officers.

How did the police know you were near a crime scene? Google told them

How did the police know you were near a crime scene? Google told them

Knowing the Silicon Valley giant held a trove of consumer mobile phone location data, investigators got a Hennepin County judge to sign a "reverse location" search warrant ordering Google to identify the locations of cellphones that had been near the crime scene in Eden Prairie, and near two food markets the victims owned in Minneapolis and St. Paul.

Massachusetts Considers Bill to Limit Facial Recognition

Massachusetts Considers Bill to Limit Facial Recognition

RELATED Amazon Pitches Facial Recognition AI to ICE Microsoft President: Facial Recognition Needs to be Regulated Google, Amazon Part Ways When It Comes to Facial Recognition If approved, the measure would make Massachusetts the first state to prohibit the use of facial-recognition surveillance by law enforcement and other state agencies.

Facial Recognition Surveillance Now at a Privacy Tipping Point

Facial Recognition Surveillance Now at a Privacy Tipping Point

Facebook, for example, now uses AI-powered facial recognition software as part of its core social networking platform to identify people, while law enforcement agencies around the world have experimented with facial recognition surveillance cameras to reduce crime and improve public safety.

Call for Legal Safeguards on Police Phone Hacking

Call for Legal Safeguards on Police Phone Hacking

Related: Police Scotland Failed to “Fully Assess” The Use of Cyber Kiosks Lindsey Miller, deputy Crown agent for serious casework, said that there was a misunderstanding that Crown counsel could offer “broad guidance on police powers.” Hacked data would only be admissible if extracted under certain legal conditions, and suggested it would be inadmissible if extracted in a manner that breached a suspect’s human rights, she said.

Amazon’s Home Surveillance Chief Declared War on “Dirtbag Criminals” as Company Got Closer to Police

Amazon’s Home Surveillance Chief Declared War on “Dirtbag Criminals” as Company Got Closer to Police

A Ring video that appears to have been produced for police reveals that the company has gone out of its way to build a bespoke portal for law enforcement officers who want access to the enormous volume of residential surveillance footage generated by customers’ cameras.

In just two years, 9,000 of these cameras were installed to spy on your car

In just two years, 9,000 of these cameras were installed to spy on your car

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, a San Francisco-based digital privacy nonprofit, has described the technology as “a form of mass surveillance .” Now, a new generation of tech firms has made it possible for private citizens to use the devices, known as automatic license plate readers, or ALPRs—without the strict oversight that governs this type of data collection by law enforcement.

Man evades capture for 15 years by using fingerprint implants

Man evades capture for 15 years by using fingerprint implants

A drug trafficker who managed to evade capture for 15 years by cutting and burning the skin of his fingertips and having it replaced with micro-implants has been arrested by Spanish police.

Amazon’s Home Security Company Is Turning Everyone Into Cops

Amazon’s Home Security Company Is Turning Everyone Into Cops

When a crime such as a stolen package is depicted on Neighbors, a Ring employee will post a comment that says, “If you have filed a police report, please share the case number and officer’s contact information below.

Distant cousin's use of DNA test kit led police to Warwick murder suspect

Distant cousin's use of DNA test kit led police to Warwick murder suspect

Colleen Fitzpatrick, co-founder of IdentiFinders, said she'd been working on the Fay case for months and finally got a break when one of the largest consumer DNA-testing companies, FamilyTreeDNA, opened its database to a free, third-party genealogy website called GEDmatch.

Dozens of Cities Have Secretly Experimented With Predictive Policing Software

Dozens of Cities Have Secretly Experimented With Predictive Policing Software

The documents obtained by Motherboard—which include PredPol contract documents, instructional manuals and slide presentations for using the software, and PredPol contract negotiation emails with government officials—were obtained from the police departments of South Jordan, UT; Mountain View, CA; Atlanta, GA; Haverhill, GA; Palo Alto, CA; Modesto, CA; Merced, CA; Livermore, CA; Tacoma, WA; and the University of California, Berkeley using public records requests.

London's Met police confess: We made just one successful collar in latest facial recog trial

London's Met police confess: We made just one successful collar in latest facial recog trial

London cops' use of facial recognition tech last week resulted in only one person being charged, while another was handed a £90 on-the-spot fine after trying to avoid the cams.

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