Walmart experiments with AI to monitor stores in real time

Walmart experiments with AI to monitor stores in real time

As the shopping experience improves, the retailer expects to see higher sales.“We really like to think of this store as an artificial intelligence factory, a place where we are building these products, experiences, where we are testing and learning,” said Mike Hanrahan, CEO of Walmart’s Intelligent Retail Lab and co-founder of , purchased by Walmart three years ago.

Cameras that guess your age and sex are coming to store shelves

Cameras that guess your age and sex are coming to store shelves

At the National Retail Federation trade show in New York earlier this year, a smart shelf on display by Mood Media tried to detect "happiness" or "fear" as people stood in front it — information a store could use to gauge reaction to a product on the shelf or an ad on a screen.

Apple AI accused of leading to man's wrongful arrest

Apple AI accused of leading to man's wrongful arrest

The detective reportedly said that this may have caused Mr Bah to be charged with thefts committed at Apple Stores in New York, Delaware, New Jersey and Massachusetts, according to court papers.

New York City’s algorithm task force is fracturing

New York City’s algorithm task force is fracturing

The city says specific examples are forthcoming As the first plan of its kind in the United States, the New York law established a model, and other local governments have launched similar programs in the time since.

How to Stop Google’s Sensorvault From Sharing Your Location With Law Enforcement

How to Stop Google’s Sensorvault From Sharing Your Location With Law Enforcement

Google gathers that location history data you’ve provided into a database named “Sensorvault,” and law enforcement can query it with a warrant: For years, police detectives have given Google warrants seeking location data tied to specific users’ accounts.

Opinion | We Built An ‘Unbelievable’ (But Legal) Facial Recognition Machine

Opinion | We Built An ‘Unbelievable’ (But Legal) Facial Recognition Machine

It’s unclear whether the Domain Awareness System currently uses facial recognition, though the Police Department experimented with it in 2012, according to Clare Garvie, an associate at the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law School.

Wirecutter Weekly: How safe is your privacy in a smart home?

Wirecutter Weekly: How safe is your privacy in a smart home?

This great CNET piece reports that facial recognition in devices like the Nest Cam IQ, Honeywell Smart Home Security, and even the Sony Aibo robot dog don’t comply with Illinois’s Biometric Information Privacy Act, which “defines ‘biometric identifiers’ as retina scans, iris scans, fingerprints, hand scans, face scans and voiceprints.” As reported in the New York Times, cameras have been installed (but not yet activated, so they say) on planes.

As cashless stores grow, so does the backlash

As cashless stores grow, so does the backlash

Before this year there was only one jurisdiction that required businesses to accept cash: Massachusetts, which passed a law nearly 40 years ago.“The potential societal cost of a cashless economy I think outweighs the potential benefits for businesses,” said Ritchie Torres, a New York City councilman for the South Bronx who introduced the bill.

Opinion | Tech Companies Say They Care

Opinion | Tech Companies Say They Care

The statement, which today reads like a quaint artifact of a simpler time, would become the company’s first privacy policy — a gently lawyered explanation of how the company collects and distributes its users’ data and information.

FBI tracked Michael Cohen's phones with controversial device

FBI tracked Michael Cohen's phones with controversial device

Search warrant documents made public Tuesday show the FBI used highly secretive and controversial cellphone sweeping technology to zero-in on President Donald Trump's former personal lawyer when agents raided his New York City home, hotel room and office last year.

Modern policing: Algorithm helps NYPD spot crime patterns

Modern policing: Algorithm helps NYPD spot crime patterns

(AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) The software, dubbed Patternizr, allows crime analysts stationed in each of the department's 77 precincts to compare robberies, larcenies and thefts to hundreds of thousands of crimes logged in the 's database, transforming their hunt for crime patterns with the click of a button.

NY governor orders probe into Facebook access to data from other apps

NY governor orders probe into Facebook access to data from other apps

NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York Governor Andrew Cuomo on Friday ordered two state agencies to investigate a media report that Facebook Inc may be accessing far more personal information than previously known from smartphone users, including health and other sensitive data.

10 Years of Privacy Violations, Disinformation, and Friend Requests From Facebook

10 Years of Privacy Violations, Disinformation, and Friend Requests From Facebook

09/06/17 Facebook’s chief security officer, Alex Stamos, discloses for the first time that Russians purchased ads in an effort to sow discord around the 2016 presidential election; a few weeks later, Facebook reveals that as many as 150 million people may have seen posts by the Kremlin-linked Internet Research Agency.

In America, your digital freedoms are what the tech companies say they are.

In America, your digital freedoms are what the tech companies say they are.

If you had done that in New York, as an American citizen, you’ve given no fewer than five organizations (the hotel, Uber, the theater, the concession vendor, and the credit card company) your private information.

Prisons Across the U.S. Are Quietly Building Databases of Incarcerated People’s Voice Prints

Prisons Across the U.S. Are Quietly Building Databases of Incarcerated People’s Voice Prints

According to Securus’s 2019 Investigator Pro contract with Alachua County, Florida (which includes Gainesville), “Inmates will participate in a covert voice print enrollment process.” In Texas, state prisoners must enroll in the voice recognition program if they want to make calls.

The Art of Eyeball Harvesting

The Art of Eyeball Harvesting

Google decides it’s going to run an auction to determine which advertiser gets which slot. The result is that advertisers can’t bid on Facebook the way they bid on Google because they don’t know what an ad is worth.

The Chinese technology helping New York police keep a closer eye on the United States’ biggest city

The Chinese technology helping New York police keep a closer eye on the United States’ biggest city

At a time when China and the United States are locked in a rivalry on several fronts including trade and technology, Hikvision – which is the world’s largest surveillance technology company and based in Hangzhou in eastern China – has supplied the equipment and software used by an American force that polices a population of about 8.6 million people.

F*@# Facebook: It’s Time For Action

F*@# Facebook: It’s Time For Action

The social-media giant has found its way into the spotlight once again: A New York Times investigation1 reveals that the company has given Amazon, Microsoft, Netflix, Yahoo and others unprecedented access to user data in what appears to be a violation of a consent decree Facebook reached with the Federal Trade Commission over previous privacy violations.

Facebook defends allowing third parties access to user messages

Facebook defends allowing third parties access to user messages

In the new post, Archibong specifically argues that Facebook never allowed its partners to access private Facebook messages without a user’s permission.

Facebook gave dozens of companies access to user data such as friends lists and private messages

Facebook gave dozens of companies access to user data such as friends lists and private messages

A report by the New York Times revealed that the social network had given numerous companies access to a plethora of private user data, ranging from the names of friends, to private messages.

8 Places Where Smartphones Tracked People’s Movements

8 Places Where Smartphones Tracked People’s Movements

The business of location data has grown dramatically in recent years, a New York Times investigation found. Rich Harris is a graphics editor on the investigative team at the New York Times, focusing primarily on technology coverage.

Google’s Dragonfly will intensify surveillance on journalists in China

Google’s Dragonfly will intensify surveillance on journalists in China

“Our objection is to those forces of totalitarianism,” said Google co-founder Sergey Brin of China’s internet controls in an interview with The New York Times, “I think that in the long term, they are going to have to open.” It was 2010, the year Google ostentatiously left the Chinese market in protest of state censorship on online expression.

Australian Gag Order Stokes Global Debate on Secrecy

Australian Gag Order Stokes Global Debate on Secrecy

Judges in Australia and some other countries, including Britain, often issue gag orders that temporarily restrict the publication of information related to a criminal proceeding on the grounds that it might sway jurors or potential jurors.

NYCLU sues ICE over changes to immigrant risk assessment algorithm

NYCLU sues ICE over changes to immigrant risk assessment algorithm

The tool provides an algorithm-based recommendation on whether an immigrant should be detained in jail until they can see a judge — or whether they can instead be released on bond in the interim.

Apps on smartphones are selling and sharing our location data 24/7

Apps on smartphones are selling and sharing our location data 24/7

According to the latest research from The New York Times, many popular, seemingly harmless Android and iOS apps are tracking our location throughout the day and seven days a week.

Opinion | The End of Privacy Began in the 1960s

Opinion | The End of Privacy Began in the 1960s

American companies remained free to gather data on the people who used their products. Congress is again wrestling with the balance between freedom of information and the right to privacy.

NYC Politician Wants to Ban Cashless Restaurants

NYC Politician Wants to Ban Cashless Restaurants

Torres tells Grub Street he is optimistic New York’s progressive city council will pass his legislation, but he expects local businesses will “mobilize to oppose the bill.” For anyone who sees the impending fight through an apathetic lens, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporter and critic, and former Eater NY editor, Melissa McCart made a salient point in her report on the topic earlier this year: “[I]n an era when an increasing number of restaurants no longer accept legal tender, it’s useful to think about who this system benefits most: the businesses and banks, at the expense of consumers.” Do businesses and banks really need more power?

UK cops won't go after researcher who reported security issue to York city officials

UK cops won't go after researcher who reported security issue to York city officials

North Yorkshire Police said today they're not pursuing a criminal case against the researcher who found a vulnerability in a mobile app developed by the York city council.

Mark Zuckerberg reportedly ordered all Facebook executives to use Android phones

Mark Zuckerberg reportedly ordered all Facebook executives to use Android phones

“We’ve long encouraged our employees and executives to use Android because it is the most popular operating system in the world,” said Facebook in response to the New York Times article.

Fake fingerprints can imitate real ones in biometric systems – research

Fake fingerprints can imitate real ones in biometric systems – research

Based on those insights, the researchers used a common machine learning technique, called a generative adversarial network, to artificially create new fingerprints that matched as many partial fingerprints as possible.

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