CNIL bans high schools' facial-recognition programs

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    The French data protection authority, the CNIL, announced it has ordered high schools in Nice and Marseille to end their facial-recognition programs. Following a review, the CNIL found the schools' deployment of the software was not in line with the EU General Data Protection Regulation's principles on proportionality and data minimization. It was concluded that the goals the facial-recognition program would help reach could "be achieved by much less intrusive means in terms of privacy and individual freedoms." (Original article is in French.)Full Story
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