I documented every surveillance camera on my way to work in New York City, and it revealed a dystopian reality

  • Cameras are everywhere — for private and public security, to help with homelessness, for personal use on the backs (and fronts) of phones, for safety on roads and cars.
  • By 2022, the total number of cameras in the world could reach 45 billion.The global video surveillance industry is forecast to reach $63 billion by 2022.
  • I documented all of the cameras on a daily commute from Brooklyn to Business Insider's headquarters in downtown Manhattan. What I found revealed a disturbing reality.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.
America, home of the brave, land of the free, is watching.

Tens of millions of cameras are watching people across the country. By 2022, the total number of cameras in the world could reach 45 billion. The global video surveillance industry is forecast to reach $63 billion by 2022.

As Arthur Holland Michel, who wrote a book about high-tech surveillance, told The Atlantic, "Someday, most major developed cities in the world will live under the unblinking gaze of some form of wide-area surveillance." New York City has an estimated 9,000 cameras linked to a system the NYPD calls the "Domain Awareness System." But there are more cameras that aren't linked to the system. I documented all of the cameras on my daily commute from Brooklyn to our office in Manhattan's Financial District. Here's what I found.

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