Why Richard Branson gave 23andMe billions to go public

Why Richard Branson gave 23andMe billions to go public

Branson says he sees 23andMe as a company with “enormous growth potential.” No — home DNA kits weren’t some kind of “pandemic winner.” Rather, the once-booming DTC genetics industry has hit a lull in the past few years, as a result of growing concerns around privacy, accuracy and value.

The risks and rewards of at-home genealogy testing

The risks and rewards of at-home genealogy testing

Anne Wojcicki, the cofounder and CEO of direct-to-consumer DNA testing firm 23andMe, told 60 Minutes that she believes that her company adheres to stricter security measures than HIPAA requires.

A Court Tried To Force Ancestry.com To Open Up Its DNA Database To Police. The Company Said No.

A Court Tried To Force Ancestry.com To Open Up Its DNA Database To Police. The Company Said No.

For months, legal experts who follow investigative genetic genealogy have expected search warrants to be issued to Ancestry and its main competitor, 23andMe, which has about 10 million DNA profiles in its database.

23andMe lays off 100 people as DNA test sales decline, CEO says she was 'surprised' to see market turn

23andMe lays off 100 people as DNA test sales decline, CEO says she was 'surprised' to see market turn

Home DNA-testing company 23andMe is laying off about 100 people, or 14% of its staff, on Thursday, in the wake of declining sales.

Opinion | Why Are You Publicly Sharing Your Child’s DNA Information?

Opinion | Why Are You Publicly Sharing Your Child’s DNA Information?

When doctors told her they didn’t think there was a medical need to test her children, she decided to use 23andMe, the direct-to-customer genetic testing company.

We Buy Gifts That Surveil Our Loved Ones Because There Is Nothing Else to Buy

We Buy Gifts That Surveil Our Loved Ones Because There Is Nothing Else to Buy

We buy DNA tests from 23AndMe that could one day end up in a police database, we buy Amazon Echo and smartphone technology used to target us with ads, and, increasingly, we are buying Amazon’s Ring doorbell cameras that are being used to watch ourselves and our neighbors, create a warrantless police surveillance apparatus, and serve as an attack surface that can allow hackers to enter our homes.

5 biggest risks of sharing your DNA with consumer genetic-testing companies

5 biggest risks of sharing your DNA with consumer genetic-testing companies

King said it is much more likely the federal government will want this DNA data for law enforcement purposes rather than to exploit any employer-employee loophole in GINA.All of these DNA testing companies explain this in their privacy statements, and 23andMe makes clear that it stands on the side of consumers.

DNA testing can share all your family secrets. Are you ready for that?

DNA testing can share all your family secrets. Are you ready for that?

DNA testing from the likes of leading services 23andMe and Ancestry, among others, has always boiled down to risk and reward, a fascination and curiosity about one’s roots and/or predispositions to disease, balanced against trepidations around privacy, security, and, for sure, the possibility of an awkward or identity-altering discovery.

Family Tree DNA offers to trade privacy to catch criminals

Family Tree DNA offers to trade privacy to catch criminals

Buzzfeed reported in January that Family Tree DNA , one of the largest genetic testing companies in the country, regularly allowed FBI agents to search its database in order to solve crimes. Family Tree DNA, along with similar DNA testing services 23andMe and allows customers to opt-out of sharing such information with law enforcement.

The FBI Wants Your Spit

The FBI Wants Your Spit

While many people are enjoying the genealogical research aided by companies such as 23andMe, Ancestry.com , and MyHeritage, they are also unaware that law enforcement is using them as “genetic informants.” In fact, Family Tree DNA has been allowing the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to submit suspects’ DNA in order to investigate unsolved violent crimes.

After you spit into a tube for a DNA test like 23andMe, experts say you shouldn't assume your data will stay private forever

After you spit into a tube for a DNA test like 23andMe, experts say you shouldn't assume your data will stay private forever

The case of the Golden State Killer: how private and protected DNA data can be exploited in public databases Justin Sullivan/Getty Images When you mail your saliva sample to a company like 23andMe, Ancestry, Helix, or any one of a handful of current DNA testing startups , they run an analysis of the genetic data it contains.

How to Delete Your Data From 23andMe, Ancestry, and Other Sites

How to Delete Your Data From 23andMe, Ancestry, and Other Sites

Current laws like the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) prohibit employers or health insurance companies from discriminating against a person based on their genes, though that doesn’t mean it couldn’t happen.

Woman uses DNA test, finds sperm donor — and pays a "devastating" price

Woman uses DNA test, finds sperm donor — and pays a "devastating" price

When Teuscher wanted to know more about her daughter's ancestry and possible health issues, she and other family members decided to get DNA tests from 23andMe and added one for Zoe. What turned up appeared to be one of the anonymous donor's immediate relatives.

Genetic testing is the future of healthcare, but many experts say companies like 23andMe are doing more harm than good

Genetic testing is the future of healthcare, but many experts say companies like 23andMe are doing more harm than good

Hazel, a researcher at Vanderbilt University, studied companies ranging from popular startups like 23andMe — which offers health and ancestry information — to under-the-radar outfits such as GEDmatch, which simply houses genetic information to help people build family trees.

DNA-testing company 23andMe has signed a $300 million deal with a drug giant. Here's how to delete your data if that freaks you out.

DNA-testing company 23andMe has signed a $300 million deal with a drug giant. Here's how to delete your data if that freaks you out.

The core service provided by most commercial genetic tests is built on the extraction of your DNA from your spit — that's how you get the information about your health or ancestry.

Ancestry, 23andMe say they will follow these rules when giving DNA data to businesses or police

Ancestry, 23andMe say they will follow these rules when giving DNA data to businesses or police

Ancestry, 23andMe and other popular companies that offer genetic testing pledged on Tuesday to be upfront when they share users' DNA data with researchers, hand it over to police or transfer it to other companies, a move aimed at addressing consumers' mounting privacy concerns.

Big business with health data – healthbank – Medium

Big business with health data – healthbank – Medium

By sending in their saliva samples, customers agree that their genetic data can be resold to research institutes or pharmaceutical companies, for example, leading to 23andme gaining such a large market value.

You Should Be Worried About Your DNA Privacy

You Should Be Worried About Your DNA Privacy

As DNA tests such as 23andMe and AncestryDNA become increasingly prevalent, concerns about genetic privacy are mounting—and with good reason, says the Atlantic writer Sarah Zhang. “Soon, it won’t be hard to imagine a world where everyone can be found for whatever reason through a relative’s DNA,” Zhang says in the video.

Exclusive: This Huge Hospital System Is Offering Its 30,000 Workers Free Genetic Tests

Exclusive: This Huge Hospital System Is Offering Its 30,000 Workers Free Genetic Tests

Klasko and the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital’s Karen Knudsen, enterprise director of the NCI-Designated Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, spoke with me about initiative and its goal of promoting personalized treatment for employees—as well as what sets it apart from increasingly popular at-home DNA testing services like 23andMe.

23andMe Cuts Off the DNA App Ecosystem It Created

23andMe Cuts Off the DNA App Ecosystem It Created

Going forward, app developers will only be able to access data from the reports 23andMe generates for customers, such as ancestry composition or risk probabilities for genetic diseases like Parkinson’s. The company says qualified researchers will still have access to raw genetic data, provided that customers have consented to share their information through the API.

23andMe Will No Longer Let App Developers Read Your DNA Data

23andMe Will No Longer Let App Developers Read Your DNA Data

Developers of health apps, weight loss services and quantified self tests have been able to use 23andMe's anonymized data sets since 2012, when the company announced the opening of its application programming interface (API).

DNA Testing Cos. Increase Lobbying as Privacy Concerns Mount

DNA Testing Cos. Increase Lobbying as Privacy Concerns Mount

As the popularity of genetic and genealogy testing companies, such as Ancestry.com and 23andMe, skyrockets, and privacy concerns mount over how user data is secured, the companies are increasing their presence in Washington.