Melbourne dentist granted court order forcing Google to unmask anonymous critic

Melbourne dentist granted court order forcing Google to unmask anonymous critic

The lawyer for a Melbourne dentist who received an anonymous online negative review has welcomed the decision by an Australian Federal Court judge compelling Google to release the identity of the reviewer.

Judge allows Melbourne dentist to try new tactic to more quickly unmask negative online reviewer

Judge allows Melbourne dentist to try new tactic to more quickly unmask negative online reviewer

A Melbourne dentist who claims he was defamed in an anonymous online review has convinced a Federal Court judge to order technology giant Google to unmask the disgruntled customer so he can launch "groundbreaking" legal action.

TikTok accused of secretly gathering user data and sending it to China

TikTok accused of secretly gathering user data and sending it to China

Getty Images TikTok, known for its quirky 15-second videos, has been illegally and secretly harvesting vast amounts of personally identifiable user data and sending it to China, according to a proposed class-action lawsuit filed in California federal court last week.

Federal court rules that the Fourth Amendment protects your laptops and smartphones from suspicionless searches at the border

Federal court rules that the Fourth Amendment protects your laptops and smartphones from suspicionless searches at the border

This court decision comes as a result of years of hard work by the ACLU, the ACLU of Massachusetts and the EFF on behalf of eleven international travelers who had been the recipient of suspicionless device searches when entering the United States.

Federal Court Rules Suspicionless Searches of Travelers’ Phones and Laptops Unconstitutional

Federal Court Rules Suspicionless Searches of Travelers’ Phones and Laptops Unconstitutional

BOSTON — In a major victory for privacy rights, a federal court in Boston today ruled that the government’s suspicionless searches of international travelers’ smartphones and laptops at airports and other U.S. ports of entry violate the Fourth Amendment.

ACCC slams Google over location data in the Federal Court

ACCC slams Google over location data in the Federal Court

"We are taking court action against Google because we allege that as a result of these on-screen representations, Google has collected, kept and used highly sensitive and valuable personal information about consumers' location without them making an informed choice," Mr Sims said.

Microsoft's LinkedIn loses appeal over access to user profiles

Microsoft's LinkedIn loses appeal over access to user profiles

(Reuters) - A federal appeals court on Monday rejected LinkedIn’s effort to stop a San Francisco company from using information that users of the professional networking website have deemed public.

US Court says that states can ignore FCC and pass their own net neutrality laws

US Court says that states can ignore FCC and pass their own net neutrality laws

However, a federal court has now ruled and opined the other way – that states do have the right to pass their own net neutrality laws, that internet service providers (ISPs) need to follow if they wish to do business in said states.

Court says FCC’s ‘unhinged’ net neutrality repeal can’t stop state laws

Court says FCC’s ‘unhinged’ net neutrality repeal can’t stop state laws

The FCC’s repeal of net neutrality rules has been significantly weakened by a federal appeals court, which ruled that the Commission could not preempt state laws like those pending in California.

Biometrics class actions target Lowe's, Home Depot for anti-shoplifting surveillance systems

Biometrics class actions target Lowe's, Home Depot for anti-shoplifting surveillance systems

4, a group of plaintiffs simultaneously filed virtually identical class action complaints in Cook County Circuit Court in Chicago against Lowe’s and in federal court in Atlanta against Home Depot, accusing the retailers of violating the Illinois state law by “surreptitiously” scanning customers’ faces as they moved about the chains’ stores in Illinois.

Another Federal Court Allows Warrantless Cellphone Searches at U.S. Border

Another Federal Court Allows Warrantless Cellphone Searches at U.S. Border

Unlike probable cause, which is the standard required for obtaining a search warrant, reasonable suspicion is a more lenient rule that lets law enforcement officials conduct searches without getting a warrant first.

EPIC - Federal Appeals Court Says Consumers Can Sue Facebook for Facial Recognition

EPIC - Federal Appeals Court Says Consumers Can Sue Facebook for Facial Recognition

EPIC filed an amicus brief in the case, arguing that the violation of the privacy law was sufficient for Facebook users to sue the company.Six Flags, where the Illinois Supreme Court unanimously decided that consumers can sue companies that violate the state's biometric privacy law.

Facebook loses facial recognition appeal, must face privacy class action

Facebook loses facial recognition appeal, must face privacy class action

(Reuters) - A federal appeals court on Thursday rejected Facebook Inc’s effort to undo a class action lawsuit claiming that it illegally collected and stored biometric data for millions of users without their consent.

Federal Court Rules Facebook Users Can Sue Company Over Unlawful Use of Face Recognition Technology

Federal Court Rules Facebook Users Can Sue Company Over Unlawful Use of Face Recognition Technology

The ruling is the first decision of an American appellate court directly addressing the unique privacy harms posed by the face recognition technology being increasingly pushed on members of the public without their knowledge and consent.

U.S. appeals court voids Google 'cookie' privacy settlement that paid users nothing

U.S. appeals court voids Google 'cookie' privacy settlement that paid users nothing

(Reuters) - A federal appeals court on Tuesday struck down Google’s class-action settlement meant to resolve claims it invaded the privacy of millions of computer users by installing “cookies” in their browsers, but paying those users nothing for their troubles.

Privacy Fears Split German Government on Use of Alexa Data as Evidence

Privacy Fears Split German Government on Use of Alexa Data as Evidence

The federal interior ministry is preparing to back a proposal from the state of Schleswig-Holstein to make evidence from smart devices and virtual assistants admissible in court, the RND news organization reported Wednesday.

New Lawsuit Alleges Apple Is Selling iTunes Listening Data

New Lawsuit Alleges Apple Is Selling iTunes Listening Data

Three iTunes customers from Rhode Island and Michigan sued Friday in federal court in San Francisco seeking to represent hundreds of thousands of residents of their home states who allegedly had their personal listening information disclosed without their consent.

Chelsea Manning to remain in jail after appeals court denies bail request

Chelsea Manning to remain in jail after appeals court denies bail request

A federal appeals court on Monday denied a request by the former US army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to be released from jail on bail, and upheld a lower court’s decision to hold Manning in civil contempt for refusing to testify before a grand jury.

Privacy watchdog taking Facebook to court, says company breached privacy laws

Privacy watchdog taking Facebook to court, says company breached privacy laws

Canada's federal privacy watchdog plans to take Facebook to court following an investigation that found the social media giant broke a number of privacy laws and failed to take responsibility for protecting Canadians' personal information.

The Biggest Lies We Heard About Net Neutrality This Week

The Biggest Lies We Heard About Net Neutrality This Week

“I would love for anyone to have Mr. Walden point to the government takeover language, like where they think that power even resides in the text,” he said, referring to the FCC’s Open Internet Order, which was passed in the 2015 and upheld by a federal appeals court the following year.

Internet Privacy in the Age of Surveillance

Internet Privacy in the Age of Surveillance

The Federal Security Service, also known as the FSB, requires a post-collection court warrant to access the records of ordinary citizens, but they can begin surveillance efforts before they request the warrant.

Privacy groups accuse Facebook of deceiving children into spending parents' money

Privacy groups accuse Facebook of deceiving children into spending parents' money

A coalition of child and privacy advocates filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Thursday after court documents that were unsealed last month revealed employees were aware that young children were playing games on the Facebook app and that the company was making it harder for their parents to obtain refunds.

Victory: Federal Court in Seattle Will Begin Disclosing Surveillance Records

Victory: Federal Court in Seattle Will Begin Disclosing Surveillance Records

The public will learn how often federal investigators in Seattle obtain private details about your communications, such as who you called and when, as a result of a petition to unseal those records brought by EFF client The Stranger.

EPIC Files Appeals with D.C. Circuit, Seeks Release of 'Predictive Analytics Report'

EPIC Files Appeals with D.C. Circuit, Seeks Release of 'Predictive Analytics Report'

EPIC has appealed a federal district court decision for the release of a "Predictive Analytics Report." The district court backed the Department of Justice when the agency claimed the "presidential communications privilege." But neither the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals nor the Supreme Court has ever permitted a federal agency to invoke that privilege in a FOIA case.

Feds to judge: We still think we can put GPS trackers on cars entering US

Feds to judge: We still think we can put GPS trackers on cars entering US

A top Homeland Security Investigations official has told a federal court that it remains the agency's policy that officers can install a GPS tracking device on cars entering the United States "without a warrant or individualized suspicion" for up to 48 hours.

Exclusive: In test case, U.S. fails to force Facebook to wiretap Messenger calls - sources

Exclusive: In test case, U.S. fails to force Facebook to wiretap Messenger calls - sources

Members of a joint federal and state task force probing the international criminal gang MS-13 had tried in August to hold Facebook in contempt of court for failing to carry out a wiretap order, Reuters reported last month.

US government loses bid to force Facebook to wiretap Messenger calls

US government loses bid to force Facebook to wiretap Messenger calls

A joint federal and state law enforcement effort investigating the MS-13 gang had pushed a district court to hold the social networking giant in contempt of court for refusing to permit real-time listening in on voice calls.

The Citizen Lab Receives Response from National Energy Board Concerning “Security Threat Monitoring Services”

The Citizen Lab Receives Response from National Energy Board Concerning “Security Threat Monitoring Services”

Director Ron Deibert, on behalf of the Citizen Lab, sent a letter raising numerous questions and serious human rights concerns with the NEB’s proposed initiative, which appeared poised to target environmental activists and Indigenous communities, particularly in light of protests and political tensions surrounding the Trans Mountain Pipeline (federal approval of which was recently quashed by the Federal Court of Appeal) and similar energy sector projects in Canada.

Privacy advocates in court fighting an uphill battle against NSA surveillance

Privacy advocates in court fighting an uphill battle against NSA surveillance

The American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation, along with private attorneys, are trying to convince a powerful federal appeals court that the program is unconstitutional, violating people's Fourth Amendment rights because it allows the government to access millions of Americans' communications without a warrant.

Appeals Court Asks the Right Questions in NSA Surveillance Case

Appeals Court Asks the Right Questions in NSA Surveillance Case

Hasbajrami, an important case involving surveillance under Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act. It is only the second time a federal appeals court has been asked to rule on whether the government can collect countless numbers of electronic communications—including those of Americans—and use these communications in criminal investigations, all without a warrant.