After CovidSafe, QR codes spark privacy concerns

After CovidSafe, QR codes spark privacy concerns

Graham Greenleaf, professor of law and information systems at the University of New South Wales summed up the dilemma: “We've got a genuinely voluntary CovidSafe app with Australia's strongest privacy policy protections, but it's now largely ignored because it's been shown to be ineffective.

Police use of secretive facial recognition software stopped by the courts

Police use of secretive facial recognition software stopped by the courts

When Ed Bridges was scanned by South Wales police using facial recognition tech, he was shocked at how invasive this new technology could be.Since South Wales police began using AFR in 2015, they have admitted to scanning and collecting the biometric information of 500,000 faces.

Federal, NSW governments use Vodafone data to see if public is following COVID-19 restrictions

Federal, NSW governments use Vodafone data to see if public is following COVID-19 restrictions

Australia has become the latest country to track the movements of the public, with the federal and New South Wales governments having received the location data of millions of Vodafone Australia customers.

It's time to track people's smartphones to ensure they self-isolate during this global pandemic, says WHO boffin

It's time to track people's smartphones to ensure they self-isolate during this global pandemic, says WHO boffin

McLaws – a professor at the University of New South Wales' School of Public Health and Community Medicine in Australia, and a member of European, US and UK epidemiology and infection control bodies – told The Register tracking played a key role in nations that were able to flatten the exponential curve of COVID-19 cases – particularly Singapore, Taiwan and South Korea.

Police facial recognition could target 'literally anybody', senior MP says

Police facial recognition could target 'literally anybody', senior MP says

According to internal documents uncovered by Sky News, South Wales Police - the force leading the Home Office-backed trial of the controversial technology - places "persons where intelligence is required" on its watchlists, alongside wanted suspects and missing people.