Police trialled facial recognition tech without clearance

Police trialled facial recognition tech without clearance

New Zealand Police first contacted the firm in January, and later set up a trial of the software, according to documents RNZ obtained under the Official Information Act. However, the high tech crime unit handling the technology appears to have not sought the necessary clearance before using it.

Facebook Will Now Use Oculus VR Data for Ads Just as Everyone Expected

Facebook Will Now Use Oculus VR Data for Ads Just as Everyone Expected

As far as what data the company is going to collect and use, here’s the official statement:Facebook will now use information about your Oculus activity, like which apps you use, to help provide these new social features and more relevant content, including ads.

Cathay Pacific: Our Seatback Screens Are Definitely Recording You

Cathay Pacific: Our Seatback Screens Are Definitely Recording You

According to a new report from Forbes, the Hong Kong flag carrier has amended its official personal data collection policy to allow the airline to compile a database with detailed information on passengers’ use of in-flight entertainment systems (IFE) – including, but not limited to, images recorded by seatback cameras, customers’ activities at airport terminals and even data obtained about membership activity in competing hotel and airline loyalty programs.

Reverse Engineering a Xinjiang Police Mass Surveillance App

Reverse Engineering a Xinjiang Police Mass Surveillance App

Launch Map. Human Rights Watch finds that officials use the IJOP app to fulfill three broad functions: collecting personal information, reporting on activities or circumstances deemed suspicious, and prompting investigations of people the system flags as problematic.

DEA Never Checked If Its Massive Surveillance Operations Are Legal, Watchdog Says

DEA Never Checked If Its Massive Surveillance Operations Are Legal, Watchdog Says

The administration set no specific standards of proof for issuing subpoenas, and officials often justified data collection using “generic” and “cursory” explanations, the IG found.“The information provided [in subpoena documents] often lacks specificity sufficient to establish the particularized facts or basis for connecting the target number to a drug investigation, even if such review had occurred,” investigators said.