Supreme Court rules Facebook's automated text system doesn't count as robocalling, handing major win to people who want to spam your phone

Supreme Court rules Facebook's automated text system doesn't count as robocalling, handing major win to people who want to spam your phone

The US Supreme Court ruled in favor of Facebook on Thursday in a case about what counts as an "automatic telephone dialing system" under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991.The Supreme Court said in the ruling that Facebook's text alerts about suspicious login attempts do not qualify as robocalls deemed illegal under that act.

Supreme Court rejects Facebook appeal in secret user tracking lawsuit

Supreme Court rejects Facebook appeal in secret user tracking lawsuit

The Supreme Court on Monday rejected an appeal from Facebook to intervene in a $15 billion class-action lawsuit charging the company with illegally tracking the online activities of its users even when they are not on the platform.

U.S. Supreme Court rebuffs Facebook appeal in user tracking lawsuit

U.S. Supreme Court rebuffs Facebook appeal in user tracking lawsuit

The justices declined to hear Facebook’s appeal of a lower court ruling that revived the proposed nationwide litigation accusing the company of violating a federal law called the Wiretap Act by secretly tracking the visits of users to websites that use Facebook features such as the “like” button.

EFF to Supreme Court: Users Must Be Able to Hold Tech Companies Accountable in Lawsuits When Their Data is Mishandled

EFF to Supreme Court: Users Must Be Able to Hold Tech Companies Accountable in Lawsuits When Their Data is Mishandled

Washington, D.C.—The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) today urged the Supreme Court to rule that consumers can take big tech companies like Facebook and Google to court, including in class action lawsuits, to hold them accountable for privacy and other user data-related violations, regardless of whether they can show they suffered identical harms.

ACLU, EFF, and Tarver Law Offices Urge Supreme Court to Protect Against Forced Disclosure of Phone Passwords to Law Enforcement

ACLU, EFF, and Tarver Law Offices Urge Supreme Court to Protect Against Forced Disclosure of Phone Passwords to Law Enforcement

- The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), along with New Jersey-based Tarver Law Offices, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to ensure the Fifth Amendment protection against self-incrimination extends to the digital age by prohibiting law enforcement from forcing individuals to disclose their phone and computer passcodes.

Supreme Court ruling could make robocalls ‘virtually unstoppable’

Supreme Court ruling could make robocalls ‘virtually unstoppable’

(To watch O’Keefe’s track record, click here)The Wall Street analyst consensus on Fury is a Strong Buy, based on 4 Buy ratings with no Sells or Holds.The stock is currently trading at $6.18 and has an average price target of $12.09, making the one-year upside 96%.

Privacy News Online | Weekly Review: October 16, 2020

Privacy News Online | Weekly Review: October 16, 2020

Location data shouldn’t be accessible to government agencies without a warrant thanks to a 2017 Supreme Court ruling.Court documents from an arson case have revealed that Google regularly gives information to law enforcement on anyone who has searched a particular keyword, including physical addresses.

Secret Service buys location data that would otherwise need a warrant

Secret Service buys location data that would otherwise need a warrant

Law enforcement agencies are required to get a warrant to obtain an individual's mobile phone location data, the Supreme Court ruled in 2018.

Criminals Will Be Forced to Give Smartphone Passcodes, as per New Jersey Supreme Court Ruling

Criminals Will Be Forced to Give Smartphone Passcodes, as per New Jersey Supreme Court Ruling

As per NorthJersey, the defendant argued that giving his smartphone passcode would amount to be testimony, which would violate his Fifth Amendment rights and protections under the law.

New Jersey Supreme Court rules that passcodes aren’t protected by Fifth Amendment

New Jersey Supreme Court rules that passcodes aren’t protected by Fifth Amendment

ShareTweet The New Jersey Supreme Court has ruled that passcodes aren’t protected by the Fifth Amendment.The rationale in these states is that while law enforcement may know about certain incriminating documents that could be accessed if the passcode were provided, providing the passcode allows access to absolutely everything on the phone – which could turn up additional evidence that prosecutors didn’t know about.

US Court Orders Defendant to Unlock Phones

US Court Orders Defendant to Unlock Phones

The Supreme Court of New Jersey ruled on Monday that defendant Robert Andrews must comply with a search warrant by turning over the passcodes for his two phones.

NJ Supreme Court: Defendants must divulge cellphone passcodes

NJ Supreme Court: Defendants must divulge cellphone passcodes

The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Monday that a criminal defendant can be compelled to reveal his cellphone passcode to investigators, rejecting the argument that such a move violates the right against self-incrimination guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

Indiana Supreme Court: Woman did not have to unlock phone for police

Indiana Supreme Court: Woman did not have to unlock phone for police

A Carmel woman who was held in contempt when she refused to unlock her smartphone for police during a criminal investigation is protected by the U.S. Constitution, the Indiana Supreme Court ruled Tuesday in a decision that could affect how law enforcement uses technology to gather evidence.

Millions of UK iPhone users say Google tracked their activity and sold their info to advertisers

Millions of UK iPhone users say Google tracked their activity and sold their info to advertisers

The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom will start hearings in a case where it is alleged that Google collected information of millions of iPhone users through the Safari Browser and sold this information to advertisers.

EFF Files Amicus Brief with Top French Court to Bring Down Controversial Avia Bill

EFF Files Amicus Brief with Top French Court to Bring Down Controversial Avia Bill

The new legal act against hate speech will have a profound impact on freedom of speech of users, and may inspire the EU’s ongoing work to reform the rules governing online platforms through the so-called Digital Services Act. On May 18, 60 French senators filed a challenge with the French Supreme Court against the Avia Bill before its promulgation, and after it passed in the National Assembly on May 13, 2020.

Infection Surveillance in the Name of Public Health

Infection Surveillance in the Name of Public Health

But could the government require a similar application in the United States or would it be a violation of the Fourth Amendment’s guarantee against “unreasonable searches?” Generally, the Fourth Amendment may be invoked when a search infringes on a reasonable expectation of privacy, or the government’s activity amounts to a trespass, per the Supreme Court’s holding in Katz v.

Suspect can’t be compelled to reveal “64-character” password, court rules

Suspect can’t be compelled to reveal “64-character” password, court rules

Writing for the majority in a ruling handed down on Wednesday, Justice Debra Todd wrote: Based upon these cases rendered by the United States Supreme Court regarding the scope of the Fifth Amendment, we conclude that compelling the disclosure of a password to a computer, that is, the act of production, is testimonial.

Victory: Pennsylvania Supreme Court Rules Police Can’t Force You to Tell Them Your Password

Victory: Pennsylvania Supreme Court Rules Police Can’t Force You to Tell Them Your Password

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court issued a forceful opinion today holding that the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects individuals from being forced to disclose the passcode to their devices to the police.

Cops Need a Warrant to Access Your Car's Data, Court Rules

Cops Need a Warrant to Access Your Car's Data, Court Rules

The court’s ruling is the first time a state Supreme Court has recognized the potential danger to privacy and constitutional rights created by allowing access to car data without judicial oversight.

Spanish Supreme Court deems electric-use info to be personal data

Spanish Supreme Court deems electric-use info to be personal data

The Contentious-Administrative Chamber of the Spanish Supreme Court ruled information gathered via an individual's use of electricity constitutes personal data, Confidencial Judicial reports.Related Stories.FTC reaches $30M settlement with company over deceptive use of lead generators.

EPIC - Federal Appeals Court Says Consumers Can Sue Facebook for Facial Recognition

EPIC - Federal Appeals Court Says Consumers Can Sue Facebook for Facial Recognition

EPIC filed an amicus brief in the case, arguing that the violation of the privacy law was sufficient for Facebook users to sue the company.Six Flags, where the Illinois Supreme Court unanimously decided that consumers can sue companies that violate the state's biometric privacy law.

Group sex app leaks locations, pics and personal details. Identifies users in White House and Supreme Court

Group sex app leaks locations, pics and personal details. Identifies users in White House and Supreme Court

We’ve seen some pretty poor security in dating apps over recent years; breaches of personal data, leaking users locations and more.We contacted 3fun about this on 1st July and asked them to fix the security flaws, as personal data was exposed.

Your car's data privacy comes into question in Georgia Supreme Court case

Your car's data privacy comes into question in Georgia Supreme Court case

Last June, the US Supreme Court also ruled that police need a warrant to get phone location data , but there are still privacy challenges as more cases take on other ways technology can collect information.

Privacy International Wins Historic Victory at UK Supreme Court

Privacy International Wins Historic Victory at UK Supreme Court

Privacy International's case stems from a 2016 decision by the IPT that the UK government may use sweeping 'general warrants' to engage in computer hacking of thousands or even millions of devices, without any approval from by a judge or reasonable grounds for suspicion.

IPhone owners can sue Apple for monopolizing App Store, Supreme Court rules

IPhone owners can sue Apple for monopolizing App Store, Supreme Court rules

New York (CNN Business)A group of iPhone owners accusing Apple of violating US antitrust rules because of its App Store monopoly can sue the company, the Supreme Court ruled Monday.

Victory! Fairfax, Virginia Judge Finds That Local Police Use of ALPR Violates the State’s Data Act

Victory! Fairfax, Virginia Judge Finds That Local Police Use of ALPR Violates the State’s Data Act

In its reversal, the Virginia Supreme Court found that the photographic and location data stored in the department’s database did meet the Data Act’s definition of ‘personal information,’ but sent the case back to the Circuit Court to determine whether the database met the Act’s definition of an “information system.” Judge Smith’s ruling affirms EFF’s view that the ALPR system does indeed provide a means through which a link to the identity of a vehicle's owner can be readily made.

EFF, Coalition Urge Supreme Court to Maintain Public Access to Government’s Use of Privately Developed Technology

EFF, Coalition Urge Supreme Court to Maintain Public Access to Government’s Use of Privately Developed Technology

The brief highlights how public access to information about controversial government programs, including facial recognition , automated tattoo recognition , and ALPRs could be limited if private companies are allowed to claim that the technology is protected by an expanded Exemption 4.

When Facial Recognition Is Used to Identify Defendants, They Have a Right to Obtain Information About the Algorithms Used on Them, EFF Tells Court

When Facial Recognition Is Used to Identify Defendants, They Have a Right to Obtain Information About the Algorithms Used on Them, EFF Tells Court

We urged the Florida Supreme Court yesterday to review a closely-watched lawsuit to clarify the due process rights of defendants identified by facial recognition algorithms used by law enforcement.

How Can Data Privacy Regulations Limit the Ability to Present Evidence in a Litigation?

How Can Data Privacy Regulations Limit the Ability to Present Evidence in a Litigation?

A recent decision of the French Supreme Court[1] illustrates this tension and highlights the need for litigators to take into account data privacy principles before producing evidence containing personal information.In this case, a company had organized mandatory staff representatives’ elections.

Big Tech Vs. Big Privacy Lawsuits

Big Tech Vs. Big Privacy Lawsuits

He’s also doing mop-up work on a seminal Supreme Court case his firm litigated involving data brokers, those shadowy companies that collect and resell consumer information. Law firms working with state attorneys general create potential conflicts of interest, he says, including the risk of AGs being influenced by campaign contributions.

More