ACLU, EFF, and Tarver Law Offices Urge Supreme Court to Protect Against Forced Disclosure of Phone Passwords to Law Enforcement

ACLU, EFF, and Tarver Law Offices Urge Supreme Court to Protect Against Forced Disclosure of Phone Passwords to Law Enforcement

- The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), along with New Jersey-based Tarver Law Offices, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to ensure the Fifth Amendment protection against self-incrimination extends to the digital age by prohibiting law enforcement from forcing individuals to disclose their phone and computer passcodes.

Criminals Will Be Forced to Give Smartphone Passcodes, as per New Jersey Supreme Court Ruling

Criminals Will Be Forced to Give Smartphone Passcodes, as per New Jersey Supreme Court Ruling

As per NorthJersey, the defendant argued that giving his smartphone passcode would amount to be testimony, which would violate his Fifth Amendment rights and protections under the law.

New Jersey Supreme Court rules that passcodes aren’t protected by Fifth Amendment

New Jersey Supreme Court rules that passcodes aren’t protected by Fifth Amendment

ShareTweet The New Jersey Supreme Court has ruled that passcodes aren’t protected by the Fifth Amendment.The rationale in these states is that while law enforcement may know about certain incriminating documents that could be accessed if the passcode were provided, providing the passcode allows access to absolutely everything on the phone – which could turn up additional evidence that prosecutors didn’t know about.

NJ Supreme Court: Defendants must divulge cellphone passcodes

NJ Supreme Court: Defendants must divulge cellphone passcodes

The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Monday that a criminal defendant can be compelled to reveal his cellphone passcode to investigators, rejecting the argument that such a move violates the right against self-incrimination guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

Suspect can’t be compelled to reveal “64-character” password, court rules

Suspect can’t be compelled to reveal “64-character” password, court rules

Writing for the majority in a ruling handed down on Wednesday, Justice Debra Todd wrote: Based upon these cases rendered by the United States Supreme Court regarding the scope of the Fifth Amendment, we conclude that compelling the disclosure of a password to a computer, that is, the act of production, is testimonial.

Victory: Pennsylvania Supreme Court Rules Police Can’t Force You to Tell Them Your Password

Victory: Pennsylvania Supreme Court Rules Police Can’t Force You to Tell Them Your Password

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court issued a forceful opinion today holding that the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects individuals from being forced to disclose the passcode to their devices to the police.

Cops Can't Force People to Unlock Their Phones With Biometrics, Court Rules

Cops Can't Force People to Unlock Their Phones With Biometrics, Court Rules

On Friday, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California ruled that requiring a suspect to unlock a device using their biometric data like face identification or an iris scan would be a violation of their Fifth Amendment protections against self-incrimination.

Court: Teen’s driving killed someone, but he can’t be forced to give up passcode

Court: Teen’s driving killed someone, but he can’t be forced to give up passcode

A Florida state appellate court has ruled that an inebriated teenager involved in a car crash that resulted in the death of another person cannot be compelled to provide a passcode to his iPhone 7—the boy can indeed invoke a Fifth Amendment privilege, protecting him against self-incrimination.

Touch ID and Face ID Don’t Make You More Secure

Touch ID and Face ID Don’t Make You More Secure

In other words, US courts have said the Fifth Amendment of the constitution protects you from being forced to unlock your phone when you use a PIN, but not when you use a fingerprint, your face, or other biometric data.