California Police Have Been Illegally Sharing License Plate Reader Data

California Police Have Been Illegally Sharing License Plate Reader Data

Some of California’s largest police departments have been collecting millions of images of drivers’ license plates and sharing them with entities around the country—without having necessary security policies in place, in violation of state law, according to a newly released state audit.

California Auditor Releases Damning Report About Law Enforcement’s Use of Automated License Plate Readers

California Auditor Releases Damning Report About Law Enforcement’s Use of Automated License Plate Readers

California police and sheriffs are failing to protect the privacy of drivers on city streets, the California State Auditor’s office determined after a seven-month investigation into the use of automated license plate readers (ALPRs) by the Los Angeles Police Department and three other local law enforcement agencies.

A new clothing line confuses automated license plate readers

A new clothing line confuses automated license plate readers

Garments from Adversarial Fashion feed junk data into surveillance cameras, in an effort to make their databases less effective.In a talk, she explained the that hoodies, shirts, dresses, and skirts trigger automated license plate readers (ALPRs) to inject useless data into systems used to track civilians.

To Search Through Millions of License Plates, Police Should Get a Warrant

To Search Through Millions of License Plates, Police Should Get a Warrant

Yang, argues that when a U.S. Postal Service inspector used a commercial ALPR database to locate a suspected mail thief, it was a Fourth Amendment search that required a warrant.