Facial recognition company Clearview AI probed by Canada privacy agencies

Facial recognition company Clearview AI probed by Canada privacy agencies

TORONTO (Reuters) - Canadian privacy authorities have launched an investigation into New York-based Clearview AI to determine whether the firm’s use of facial recognition technology complies with the country’s privacy laws, the agencies said on Friday.

This man says he's stockpiling billions of our photos

This man says he's stockpiling billions of our photos

First came a front-page investigation in The New York Times , revealing Clearview has been working with law enforcement agencies to match photos of unknown faces to people's online images.

Clearview AI says to opt-out of their facial recognition database, send them a government-issued photo ID

Clearview AI says to opt-out of their facial recognition database, send them a government-issued photo ID

Obviously, we're not recommending for anyone to do this, but rather we're pointing out how preposterous it is that they'll only delete the data they have on you if you send them more data, including your government-issued ID.

Clearview AI - super crime fighter or the death of privacy as we know it?

Clearview AI - super crime fighter or the death of privacy as we know it?

In a nutshell, the New York Times published an article on Ton-That (and others’ as you will see) tiny company Clearview AI on January 18, 2020 that revealed, among many other serious things, that the company claims to have quietly scraped Facebook, YouTube, Venmo and millions of other websites to assemble a database of 3 billion faces.

Clearview’s Face Surveillance Shows Why We Need a Strong Federal Consumer Privacy Law

Clearview’s Face Surveillance Shows Why We Need a Strong Federal Consumer Privacy Law

Since the New York Times Clearview story was published, there has been some discussion online about using the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA)—a notoriously vague pre-Internet law intended to punish those who break into private computer systems—to go after scraping of publicly available websites.

Clearview AI sued over facial recognition privacy concerns

Clearview AI sued over facial recognition privacy concerns

Getty Images A lawsuit is taking aim at Clearview AI, a controversial facial recognition app being used by US law enforcement to identify suspects and other people.

New Jersey cops told to halt all use of controversial facial-recognition technology

New Jersey cops told to halt all use of controversial facial-recognition technology

The order was issued Friday to county prosecutors, concerning a New York-based company called Clearview AI.“Like many people, I was troubled,” state Attorney General Gurbir Grewal said about the company’s techniques, which were first reported by The New York Times.

Rogue NYPD cops are using facial recognition app Clearview

Rogue NYPD cops are using facial recognition app Clearview

Clearview AI, which has scraped millions of photos from social media and other public sources for its facial recognition program — earning a cease-and-desist order from Twitter — has been pitching itself to law enforcement organizations across the country, including to the NYPD.

How to block Facebook and Google from identifying your face

How to block Facebook and Google from identifying your face

Facebook has a setting that can recognize your face so that you're automatically suggested as a tag in pictures and video that your friends upload.

CBC Radio

CBC Radio

A secretive facial recognition software used by hundreds of police forces is raising concerns after a New York Times investigation said it could "end privacy as we know it.".

Clearview app lets strangers find your name, info with snap of a photo, report says

Clearview app lets strangers find your name, info with snap of a photo, report says

A startup called Clearview AI has made that possible, and its app is currently being used by hundreds of law enforcement agencies in the US, including the FBI, says a Saturday report in The New York Times.

Law enforcement is using a facial recognition app with huge privacy issues

Law enforcement is using a facial recognition app with huge privacy issues

Read – Emotion-Detecting Technology Should be Banned, Says AI Now. In fact, the software is already noted to be violating the policies of a lot of the websites that it collects the images from.

The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It

The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It

If you change a privacy setting in Facebook so that search engines can’t link to your profile, your Facebook photos won’t be included in the database, he said.Mr. Ton-That then took my photo with the app.