We need more than deplatforming

We need more than deplatforming

Commit to meaningful transparency of platform algorithms so we know how and what content is being amplified, to whom, and the associated impact.These are actions the platforms can and should commit to today.

Before Envelopes, People Protected Messages With Letterlocking

Before Envelopes, People Protected Messages With Letterlocking

To guard her final missive from prying eyes, the queen used a “butterfly lock”—one of hundreds of techniques catalogued by Dambrogio, collaborator Daniel Starza Smith, and their research team in a fast-growing dictionary of letterlocking.

Snowden Warns Governments Are Using Coronavirus to Build 'the Architecture of Oppression'

Snowden Warns Governments Are Using Coronavirus to Build 'the Architecture of Oppression'

“Every academic, every researcher who's looked at this knew this was coming,” says famed whistleblower Edward Snowden in an exclusive interview with VICE co-founder Shane Smith.

Background location tracking down 68% after iOS 13 launch- 9to5Mac

Background location tracking down 68% after iOS 13 launch- 9to5Mac

Like iOS, Android 10 also alerts users when an existing app collects location data in the background and provides a shortcut to stop the app from doing so.

Privacy protection essential to shield human rights, says Microsoft's Smith

Privacy protection essential to shield human rights, says Microsoft's Smith

LISBON (Reuters) - Microsoft President Brad Smith said on Wednesday a “new wave” of data privacy protection and other security measures was needed to safeguard people’s rights at a time when “everything has gone digital”.

Microsoft president: Data privacy is one of the 'fundamental freedoms of our time'

Microsoft president: Data privacy is one of the 'fundamental freedoms of our time'

videoData privacy is one of the “fundamental freedoms of our time,” said Microsoft President Brad Smith on Friday while discussing concerns related to cloud computing and other technological advances affecting society.CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS.

2024 is Mr. Orwell’s 1984

2024 is Mr. Orwell’s 1984

You don’t need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows and you don’t have to be paranoid to recognize that new technologies have enabled citizens of the industrialized world to be watched, measured, rated, judged and analyzed daily to a degree that even Winston Smith, the hapless worker bee from George Orwell’s prescient 1949 novel 1984, might find intrusive.

Why I Am Naming My First-Born Son John Smith

Why I Am Naming My First-Born Son John Smith

When we first heard the wonderful news, we started thinking so hard about names. But I know I’d be even more sad if my child went through life with my wife’s last name, which is so easily google-able.

Victory! Fairfax, Virginia Judge Finds That Local Police Use of ALPR Violates the State’s Data Act

Victory! Fairfax, Virginia Judge Finds That Local Police Use of ALPR Violates the State’s Data Act

In its reversal, the Virginia Supreme Court found that the photographic and location data stored in the department’s database did meet the Data Act’s definition of ‘personal information,’ but sent the case back to the Circuit Court to determine whether the database met the Act’s definition of an “information system.” Judge Smith’s ruling affirms EFF’s view that the ALPR system does indeed provide a means through which a link to the identity of a vehicle's owner can be readily made.

Microsoft: Companies "no longer comfortable" storing data in Australia after controversial encryption law

Microsoft: Companies "no longer comfortable" storing data in Australia after controversial encryption law

Others in the business of technology have been less polite - co-founder of Australian enterprise software company Atlassian, Scott Farquhar, said at the Safe Encryption Australian forum: “The law has created uncertainty for our staff and our customers, it places the tech industry in a chokehold.".

Tech companies not 'comfortable' storing data in Australia, Microsoft warns

Tech companies not 'comfortable' storing data in Australia, Microsoft warns

On Wednesday the company’s president and chief legal officer, Brad Smith, said customers were asking it to build data centres elsewhere as a result of the changes, and the industry needed greater protection against the creation of “systemic weaknesses” in their products.

Microsoft president says WA state privacy bill could impact facial recognition technology globally

Microsoft president says WA state privacy bill could impact facial recognition technology globally

Two of the top companies developing facial recognition software are in Washington state, where a bill that would regulate the technology is working its way through the legislature. A few weeks before, Smith outlined his concerns about facial recognition technology and the need for regulation during a speech in Washington D.C.

Popular app TikTok agrees to $5.7 million FTC fine for collecting kids’ data

Popular app TikTok agrees to $5.7 million FTC fine for collecting kids’ data

The FTC said the app violated the federal Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, which requires kid-oriented websites to get parents’ consent before collecting personal information from children under 13.

Washingtonpost.com: Microsoft to Rid Windows of Tracking Numbers

Washingtonpost.com: Microsoft to Rid Windows of Tracking Numbers

Enter symbols separated by a space: Look Up Symbols Portfolio Made Possible by: Microsoft to Rid Windows of Tracking Numbers By Ted Bridis Associated Press Monday, March 8, 1999; Page A08 Microsoft Corp., which sells the software runs most of the world's personal computers, said yesterday that its latest version of Windows generates a unique serial number that partly is planted within electronic documents and could be used to trace the identity of authors.

Microsoft: It would be cruel to stop government agencies using facial recognition software

Microsoft: It would be cruel to stop government agencies using facial recognition software

"A sweeping ban on all government use clearly goes too far and risks being cruel in its humanitarian effect." Read more : Amazon investors are cranking up the pressure on Jeff Bezos to stop selling facial recognition tech to government agencies Smith referenced the fact that the National Human Genome Research Institute is using facial recognition to improve the diagnosis of DiGeorge syndrome , a rare, genetic disease, in Africans, Asians, and Latin Americans.

Microsoft's president says tech's bruising 2018 has left scars that will result in US federal regulation as early as this year

Microsoft's president says tech's bruising 2018 has left scars that will result in US federal regulation as early as this year

Referring to the so-called "tech lash," which was in part sparked by Facebook's giant Cambridge Analytica data breach in March 2018, Smith said the incident "captivated people's attention in a way that data breaches or issues in the past had not." The European Union significantly strengthened privacy laws with the introduction of GDPR, while California broke ground with its own privacy legislation last year.

Microsoft Wants to Stop AI's 'Race to the Bottom'

Microsoft Wants to Stop AI's 'Race to the Bottom'

But Microsoft president Brad Smith took it one step further on Thursday, asking governments to regulate the use of facial-recognition technology to ensure it does not invade personal privacy or become a tool for discrimination or surveillance.

The FTC’s top consumer protection official can’t go after Facebook — or 100 other companies

The FTC’s top consumer protection official can’t go after Facebook — or 100 other companies

The Federal Trade Commission’s top consumer protection official is prohibited from handling the cases involving 120 different companies, including Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft, and Uber, according to financial disclosure documents published by Public Citizen today.

Google to shut down Google+ after failing to disclose user data leak

Google to shut down Google+ after failing to disclose user data leak

This March, as Facebook was coming under global scrutiny over the harvesting of personal data for Cambridge Analytica, Google discovered a skeleton in its own closet: a bug in the API for Google+ had been allowing third-party app developers to access the data not just of users who had granted permission, but of their friends.