Exclusive: New York Times phasing out all 3rd-party advertising data

Exclusive: New York Times phasing out all 3rd-party advertising data

The New York Times will no longer use 3rd-party data to target ads come 2021, executives tell Axios, and it is building out a proprietary first-party data platform.Beginning in July, The Times will begin to offer clients 45 new proprietary first-party audience segments to target ads.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey Tells Employees They Can Work From Home ‘Forever’—Before You Celebrate, There’s A Catch

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey Tells Employees They Can Work From Home ‘Forever’—Before You Celebrate, There’s A Catch

Given the time frame of reopening, coupled with the opportunity to remain working from home, this new program means that it's highly conceivable that the vast majority of Twitter employees will work remotely for the foreseeable future—or forever.

U.S. judge blocks Twitter's bid to reveal government surveillance requests

U.S. judge blocks Twitter's bid to reveal government surveillance requests

(Reuters) - Twitter Inc will not be able to reveal surveillance requests it received from the U.S. government after a federal judge accepted government arguments that this was likely to harm national security after a near six-year long legal battle.

The Coronavirus Class Divide: Space and Privacy

The Coronavirus Class Divide: Space and Privacy

“Bleak House,” the 1852 novel some consider Dickens’s best, even traces the class lines of an epidemic, revealing its two-sided logic: Its threat is universal, but its real-world damage concentrates on the poor.

Researchers expose vulnerabilities of password managers

Researchers expose vulnerabilities of password managers

Senior author of the study, Dr. Siamak Shahandashti from the Department of Computer Science at the University of York, said: "Vulnerabilities in password managers provide opportunities for hackers to extract credentials, compromising commercial information or violating employee information.

Before Clearview Became a Police Tool, It Was a Secret Plaything of the Rich

Before Clearview Became a Police Tool, It Was a Secret Plaything of the Rich

Clearview was unknown to the general public until this January, when The New York Times reported that the secretive start-up had developed a breakthrough facial recognition system that was in use by hundreds of law enforcement agencies.

‘Flood the Streets’: ICE Targets Sanctuary Cities With Increased Surveillance

‘Flood the Streets’: ICE Targets Sanctuary Cities With Increased Surveillance

The request follows an earlier decision, made public last month, to deploy elite tactical BORTAC agents — immigration SWAT teams that are normally assigned to risky border smuggling, rescue and intelligence operations — to help arrest and deport immigrants in sanctuary cities.

ACLU Sues to End ICE’s Rigged Algorithm for Detaining Immigrants

ACLU Sues to End ICE’s Rigged Algorithm for Detaining Immigrants

The risk assessment algorithm is supposed to provide a recommendation to ICE officers who are then meant to make the final decision, but the agency’s New York Field Office diverged from the algorithm’s ruling less than 1 percent of the time since 2017.

Clearview AI - super crime fighter or the death of privacy as we know it?

Clearview AI - super crime fighter or the death of privacy as we know it?

In a nutshell, the New York Times published an article on Ton-That (and others’ as you will see) tiny company Clearview AI on January 18, 2020 that revealed, among many other serious things, that the company claims to have quietly scraped Facebook, YouTube, Venmo and millions of other websites to assemble a database of 3 billion faces.

'I wasn't allowed to buy my burrito with cash'

'I wasn't allowed to buy my burrito with cash'

Image caption Nicholas Duggan was "very taken aback" to find his cash refused During a recent lunch hour in New York, a sea of office workers filled the Hudson Eats food court, where staff prepared pizza, barbecue and chopped salad orders at incredible speed.

CBC Radio

CBC Radio

A secretive facial recognition software used by hundreds of police forces is raising concerns after a New York Times investigation said it could "end privacy as we know it.".

Leaked data proves just how much our phones are spying on us

Leaked data proves just how much our phones are spying on us

The investigation was coordinated by the New York Times Privacy Project and used a leak from a location data company, one of many unknown businesses from an under-reported industry dedicated to using electronic data to track every single one of us everywhere we go.

Mystic Man Charged With Reddit Threat To Murder African-Americans

Mystic Man Charged With Reddit Threat To Murder African-Americans

MYSTIC, CT —A 31-year-old Mystic man, Trevor Spring, was charged by state police after New York Police Department detectives were tipped to a threatening post he made on Reddit to kill African-Americans in Harlem.

Opinion | You Should Be Freaking Out About Privacy

Opinion | You Should Be Freaking Out About Privacy

Like, was it my idea to go to this place for a vacation, or was it Facebook’s idea?” If being tracked by a beer company doesn’t cross the line for you, let’s see how you feel when we take it up a level.

China is using DNA samples to try to re-create the faces of Uighurs

China is using DNA samples to try to re-create the faces of Uighurs

The news: Chinese researchers are using blood taken from Uighurs to try to work out how to use a DNA sample to re-create an image of a person’s face, according to an investigation by the New York Times.

Toronto’s City of Tomorrow Is Scaled Back Amid Privacy Concerns

Toronto’s City of Tomorrow Is Scaled Back Amid Privacy Concerns

Waterfront Toronto, the government agency responsible for development of the area, voted unanimously to limit the ambitions of the company, Sidewalk Labs, from its original 190-acre plan to 12 acres.

Google Might Soon Let Huawei Use its Services Again

Google Might Soon Let Huawei Use its Services Again

Google apps and the Play store might soon be returning to Huawei devices, according to a report from the New York Times.An executive order signed by US president (ugh) Donald Trump in May banned US companies from purchasing telecommunications equipment from foreign companies, including Huawei, deemed a national security risk.

Snowden will make first major appearance since U.S. lawsuit at conference next month

Snowden will make first major appearance since U.S. lawsuit at conference next month

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Fugitive U.S. intelligence whistleblower Edward Snowden will speak next month by video at Web Summit in Lisbon, billed by the organizers as the world’s largest annual tech conference.

N.Y.P.D. Detectives Gave a Boy, 12, a Soda. He Landed in a DNA Database.

N.Y.P.D. Detectives Gave a Boy, 12, a Soda. He Landed in a DNA Database.

The New York Police Department has taken DNA samples from people convicted of crimes, as well as from people who are only arrested or sometimes simply questioned.

Exclusive: Fearing data privacy issues, Google cuts some Android phone data for wireless carriers

Exclusive: Fearing data privacy issues, Google cuts some Android phone data for wireless carriers

NEW YORK/SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Alphabet Inc’s Google has shut down a service it provided to wireless carriers globally that showed them weak spots in their network coverage, people familiar with the matter told Reuters, because of Google’s concerns that sharing data from users of its Android phone system might attract the scrutiny of users and regulators.

NY Governor Suggests Creating A Database Of People With Mental Illness

NY Governor Suggests Creating A Database Of People With Mental Illness

“Four elements: an assault weapon ban and high capacity magazines, universal background check, mental health database, Red Flag laws.The assault-weapon ban, the mental health database, and universal background checks have been the law in The Empire State for six years, according to North Country Public Radio.

Opinion | What We’ve Learned From Our Privacy Project (So Far)

Opinion | What We’ve Learned From Our Privacy Project (So Far)

It’s unnervingly easy to violate the privacy of others — purposefully or inadvertently — using surveillance tools accessible to most everyone.

How Hong Kong’s Protestors Are Hindering (and Hijacking) the Tools of Surveillance

How Hong Kong’s Protestors Are Hindering (and Hijacking) the Tools of Surveillance

The channel was largely created in response to cops no longer wearing their identification badges, and reportedly doxxed officers with posts including their personal information, social media posts, and both intimate photos and photos of their family.

US attorney general says encryption creates security risk

US attorney general says encryption creates security risk

Gail Kent, Facebook’s global public policy lead on security, recently said that allowing the government’s ability to gain access to encrypted communications would jeopardize cybersecurity for millions of law-abiding people who rely on it.

New York City bill could make selling phone location data illegal

New York City bill could make selling phone location data illegal

According to The New York Times, selling location data generates billions of dollars per year for telecommunication firms and mobile app companies. It's not guaranteed to pass, but the New York City bill could be the first in a trend of cities establishing their own location data rules.

Fare Payment Without the Stasi

Fare Payment Without the Stasi

Hospitality: visitors and occasional riders should be able to use the system with ease, with flexible options for stored value (including easy top-up options) and daily, weekly, and monthly passes, and no excessive surcharges.

Hacked Border Surveillance Firm Wants To Profile Drivers, Passengers, and Their “Likely Trip Purpose” In New York City

Hacked Border Surveillance Firm Wants To Profile Drivers, Passengers, and Their “Likely Trip Purpose” In New York City

According to an internal presentation released by the Perceptics hacker and reviewed by The Intercept, the company pitched New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority, or MTA, in February of this year on how Perceptics’ car-scanning camera arrays, already deployed and honed in areas like the Mexican border and an assortment of U.S. military installations, could help the MTA track down drivers.

Will Business Lose Its Cookies Over These New Privacy Laws?

Will Business Lose Its Cookies Over These New Privacy Laws?

While New York and California should be applauded for taking steps to protect the privacy and data of their citizens, having multiple sets of requirements for websites and businesses alike (as we have witnessed with more than 50 U.S. jurisdictions' having individual and not necessarily complementary breach notification laws) will necessarily lead to widespread difficulty in their implementation and accessibility.

Facial recognition is coming to US schools, starting in New York

Facial recognition is coming to US schools, starting in New York

BuzzFeed News got its hands on a copy of a letter distributed to the students' parents, and it describes Aegis as "an early warning system" that can notify officials of threats.

New York Public School District First to Use Facial-recognition System

New York Public School District First to Use Facial-recognition System

Until the New York State Department of Education stepped in to stop the bad press from spreading, the Lockport (New York) City School District announced that it would become the first public school in the country to fire up a facial-recognition system that would scan its students, staff, and faculty.